admirer

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ad·mire

 (ăd-mīr′)
v. ad·mired, ad·mir·ing, ad·mires
v.tr.
1. To regard with pleasure, wonder, and approval: admired the sculptures at the art museum.
2. To have a high opinion of; esteem or respect: I admired her ability as a violinist.
3. Chiefly New England & Upper Southern US To enjoy (something): "I just admire to get letters, but I don't admire to answer them" (Dialect Notes).
4. Archaic To marvel or wonder at.
v.intr. New England & Upper Southern US
To marvel at something. Often used with at.

[French admirer, from Old French amirer, from Latin admīrārī, to wonder at : ad-, ad- + mīrārī, to wonder (from mīrus, wonderful; see smei- in Indo-European roots).]

ad·mir′er n.
ad·mir′ing·ly adv.

ad•mir•er

(ædˈmaɪər ər)
n.
1. a person who admires another: He was a great admirer of Woodrow Wilson.
2. a person who is attracted to another: He was one of her many admirers.
[1605–15]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.admirer - a person who backs a politician or a team etc.admirer - a person who backs a politician or a team etc.; "all their supporters came out for the game"; "they are friends of the library"
advocate, advocator, exponent, proponent - a person who pleads for a cause or propounds an idea
anglophil, anglophile - an admirer of England and things English
believer, truster - a supporter who accepts something as true
Boswell - a devoted admirer and recorder of another's words and deeds
cheerleader - an enthusiastic and vocal supporter; "he has become a cheerleader for therapeutic cloning"
Confederate - a supporter of the Confederate States of America
corporatist - a supporter of corporatism
enthusiast, partizan, partisan - an ardent and enthusiastic supporter of some person or activity
Francophil, Francophile - an admirer of France and everything French
free trader - an advocate of unrestricted international trade
functionalist - an adherent of functionalism
Jacobite - a supporter of James II after he was overthrown or a supporter of the Stuarts
loyalist, stalwart - a person who is loyal to their allegiance (especially in times of revolt)
New Dealer - a supporter of the economic policies in the United States known as the New Deal
Graecophile, philhellene, philhellenist - an admirer of Greece and everything Greek
mainstay, pillar - a prominent supporter; "he is a pillar of the community"
Roundhead - a supporter of parliament and Oliver Cromwell during the English Civil War
seconder - someone who endorses a motion or petition as a necessary preliminary to a discussion or vote
Shavian - an admirer of G. B. Shaw or his works
endorser, indorser, ratifier, subscriber - someone who expresses strong approval
well-wisher, sympathiser, sympathizer - someone who shares your feelings or opinions and hopes that you will be successful
toaster, wassailer - someone who proposes a toast; someone who drinks to the health of success of someone or some venture
maintainer, sustainer, upholder - someone who upholds or maintains; "firm upholders of tradition"; "they are sustainers of the idea of democracy"
verifier, voucher - someone who vouches for another or for the correctness of a statement
Whig - a supporter of the American Revolution
2.admirer - a person who admiresadmirer - a person who admires; someone who esteems or respects or approves
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
venerator - someone who regards with deep respect or reverence
marveller, wonderer - someone filled with admiration and awe; someone who wonders at something
3.admirer - someone who admires a young womanadmirer - someone who admires a young woman; "she had many admirers"
lover - a person who loves someone or is loved by someone
fancier, enthusiast - a person having a strong liking for something
suer, suitor, wooer - a man who courts a woman; "a suer for the hand of the princess"
worshiper, worshipper - someone who admires too much to recognize faults

admirer

noun
1. fan, supporter, follower, enthusiast, partisan, disciple, buff (informal), protagonist, devotee, worshipper, adherent, votary He was an admirer of her grandmother's paintings.
2. suitor, lover, boyfriend, sweetheart, beau, wooer He was the most persistent of her admirers.

admirer

noun
1. One who ardently admires:
Informal: fan.
2. A man who courts a woman:
Translations
مُعْجَب بِمُعْجَب بِأمْرَأَه
ctitelobdivovatel
beundrer
csodáló
aîdáandi
ctiteľobdivovateľ

admirer

[ədˈmaɪərəʳ] Nadmirador(a) m/f

admirer

[ədˈmaɪərər] n
(= fan) → admirateur/trice m/f
an admirer of sth/sb → un admirateur de qch/qn
(= suitor) → admirateur/trice m/f

admirer

nBewund(e)rer(in) m(f), → Verehrer(in) m(f); (dated, hum: = suitor) → Verehrer m (hum)

admirer

[ədˈmaɪərəʳ] nammiratore/trice

admire

(ədˈmaiə) verb
1. to look at with great pleasure and often to express this pleasure. I've just been admiring your new car.
2. to have a very high opinion of (something or someone). I admire John's courage.
ˈadmirable (ˈӕdmə-) adjective
extremely good. His behaviour during the riot was admirable.
ˈadmirably (ˈӕdmə-) adverb
extremely well. He's admirably suited to the job.
admiration (ӕdmiˈreiʃən) noun
They were filled with admiration at the team's performance.
adˈmirer noun
1. one who admires (someone or something). He is an admirer of Mozart.
2. a man who is attracted by a particular woman. She has many admirers.
adˈmiring adjective
an admiring glance.
adˈmiringly adverb
References in classic literature ?
It is still possible to discuss his place in art, and the adulation of his admirers is perhaps no less capricious than the disparagement of his detractors; but one thing can never be doubtful, and that is that he had genius.
I was going to tell you how many unmistakeable admirers I had:- Sir Thomas Ashby was one,--Sir Hugh Meltham and Sir Broadley Wilson are old codgers, only fit companions for papa and mamma.
We have seen what legions of admirers and friends Barbicane's project had rallied round its author.
The famous little Becky Puppet has been pronounced to be uncommonly flexible in the joints, and lively on the wire; the Amelia Doll, though it has had a smaller circle of admirers, has yet been carved and dressed with the greatest care by the artist; the Dobbin Figure, though apparently clumsy, yet dances in a very amusing and natural manner; the Little Boys' Dance has been liked by some; and please to remark the richly dressed figure of the Wicked Nobleman, on which no expense has been spared, and which Old Nick will fetch away at the end of this singular performance.
She made use of me to tease other admirers, and she turned the very familiarity between herself and me, to the account of putting a constant slight on my devotion to her.
Willis, issued this touching appeal to the admirers of genius on behalf of the neglected author, his dying wife and her devoted mother, then living under very straitened circumstances in a little cottage at Fordham, N.
Geoffrey looked from one to the other of his admirers with an expression on his face which was quite new to them, and with something in his manner which puzzled them all.
As the most zealous adversaries of the plan of the convention in this State are, in general, not less zealous admirers of the constitution of the State, the question may be retorted, and it may be asked, Why was not a time for the like purpose fixed in the constitution of this State?
Watching the two young people with keen powers of observation, necessarily concentrated on them by the complete seclusion of her life, the invalid lady discovered signs of roused sensibility in Miss Haldane, when Arthur was present, which had never yet shown themselves in her social relations with other admirers eager to pay their addresses to her.
You also know of the legacy of five thousand pounds, left to him shortly afterwards, by one of those many admirers among the soft sex whose good graces this fascinating man had contrived to win.
The latter, who had seen enough of it by this time, by a rapid motion put aside his too demonstrative admirers and went out of the palace, directing his steps immediately toward the balloon, for it was now six o'clock in the evening.
Mrs Merdle,' Mr Dorrit insinuatingly pursued, 'I left, as you will be prepared to hear, the--ha--observed of all observers, the--hum-- admired of all admirers, the leading fascination and charm of Society in Rome.