admittedly


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ad·mit·ted·ly

 (ăd-mĭt′ĭd-lē)
adv.
By general admission; confessedly.

admittedly

(ədˈmɪtɪdlɪ)
adv
(sentence modifier) willingly conceded: admittedly I am afraid.

ad•mit•ted•ly

(ædˈmɪt ɪd li)

adv.
by acknowledgment; by one's own admission; confessedly.
[1795–1805]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.admittedly - as acknowledgedadmittedly - as acknowledged; "true, she is the smartest in her class"

admittedly

adverb it must be admitted, certainly, undeniably, it must be said, to be fair or honest, avowedly, it cannot be denied, it must be allowed, confessedly, it must be confessed, allowedly It's only a theory, admittedly, but the pieces fit together.
Translations
بِاعْتِرَاف الجَمِيع
nesporně
rigtignokutvivlsomt
bevallottan
óneitanlega
bilindiği üzereitiraf etmek gerekirse

admittedly

[ədˈmɪtɪdlɪ] ADV it's only a theory, admittedly, butreconozco que sólo es una teoría, pero ...es verdad que or de acuerdo que sólo es una teoría, pero ...
admittedly, economists often disagree among themselveshay que reconocer que or hay que admitir que or es verdad que los economistas a menudo no están de acuerdo entre ellos

admittedly

[ədˈmɪtɪdli] advil faut l'admettre
It's only a theory, admittedly, but → Ce n'est qu'une théorie, il faut l'admettre, mais ...
You had to pay to get in, though admittedly, not very much → Il fallait payer pour entrer, encore que, il faut l'admettre, pas beaucoup.

admittedly

advzugegebenermaßen; admittedly this is truezugegeben, das stimmt

admittedly

[ədˈmɪtɪdlɪ] advbisogna ammettere or riconoscere (che), va detto (che)

admit

(ədˈmit) past tense, past participle adˈmitted verb
1. to allow to enter. This ticket admits one person.
2. to say that one accepts as true. He admitted (that) he was wrong.
adˈmissible (-səbl) adjective
allowable. admissible evidence.
adˈmission (-ʃən) noun
1. being allowed to enter; entry. They charge a high price for admission.
2. (an) act of accepting the truth of (something). an admission of guilt.
adˈmittance noun
the right or permission to enter. The notice said `No admittance'.
adˈmittedly adverb
as is generally accepted. Admittedly, she is not well.
References in classic literature ?
Gardener was admittedly the best-dressed woman in Black Hawk, drove the best horse, and had a smart trap and a little white-and-gold sleigh.
I have it from you then--for it's of great importance--that he was definitely and admittedly bad?
The type of rudder is unaffected by the new rules, so we may expect to see the Long-Davidson make (the patent on which has just expired) come largely into use henceforward, though the strain on the sternpost in turning at speeds over forty miles an hour is admittedly very severe.
Still, it was admittedly a triumph that the van der Luydens, at May's request, should have stayed over in order to be present at her farewell dinner for the Countess Olenska.
It was marvellous how thoroughly and clearly he had recognised Ernestine at once as a type of that other world of womenkind, of which he admittedly knew nothing.
There was a desk for his secretary, now vacant, and beyond, in the shadows of the apartment, winged bookcases which held a collection of editions de luxe, first editions, and a great collection of German and Russian literature, admittedly unique.
He had been what is known in some parts of the Union (which is admittedly a free country) as a "merchant"; that is to say, he kept a retail shop for the sale of such things as are commonly sold in shops of that character.
Lastly, to complete this overwhelming testimony, two analytical chemists actually produced in Court the arsenic which they had found in the body, in a quantity admittedly sufficient to have killed two persons instead of one.
This metrical system, thus shaped, has provided the indispensable formal basis for making English poetry admittedly the greatest in the modern world.
But that, admittedly, had been a very solemn study.
He's admittedly one of the world's greatest toxicologists "
MacWhirr (a pretentious person with a scraggy neck and a disdainful manner) was admittedly ladylike, and in the neighbourhood considered as "quite superior.