admitter

admitter

(ædˈmɪtə)
n
a person who admits or something which admits
References in periodicals archive ?
Whereas the guilty admitter may naturally launch into the details of his admitted guilt, false confessors, by definition, do not have the substance to back up their admissions.
She also wanted to ensure that the offending party--even if it was a physician known as a "big admitter"--was dealt with fairly, but appropriately.
As group signatures with an additional functionality, a new open functionality, which we call message-dependent opening, has been proposed in [43-45], where a signed message-dependent token is generated by an authority called admitter and an opener who has the opening key can open the group signatures using the corresponding token.
Audrey's new occupation contains within its title a dual signifier: her job marks her as an "admitter." Drawing on Culler's work on puns, "admit" may be read as either confess (admit) or take in (admit).
Burda, D.: And what is your bid for this loyal admitter? Please, don't hold back.
The vendor gets to someone in your organization--your chief information officer, your top admitter, maybe big donor on your board--and convinces them that System Y makes big magic.
Needless to say, this guy is the hospital's highest single admitter, accounting for nearly 8 percent of all surgical admissions.
But what if the surgeon assigned to the team is a follower and can't get the #1 admitter to go along?
Henson, M.D., Vice President of Medical Services at Mercy Medical Center, Springfield, Ohio, first used a locum tenens in June 1988 when a primary admitter announced he would be retiring after 33 years in practice.
Validity of MMPI sex offender scales with admitters and no admitters Psychological Assessment, 5, 302-306.
* Demonstrate improved skills, knowledge, and ability to credential and privilege physicians who are employed by the organization, who providetelemedicine services, who are low volume admitters, or who perform few procedures and/or see no patients;