adoptability


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Related to adoptability: adaptability

a·dopt

 (ə-dŏpt′)
tr.v. a·dopt·ed, a·dopt·ing, a·dopts
1. To take on the legal responsibilities as parent of (a child that is not one's biological child).
2. To become the owner or caretaker of (a pet, especially one from a shelter).
3.
a. To take and follow (a course of action, for example) by choice or assent: adopt a new technique.
b. To take up and make one's own: adopt a new idea.
4. To move to or resettle in (a place).
5. To take on or assume: adopted an air of importance.
6. To vote to accept: adopt a resolution.
7. To choose as standard or required in a course: adopt a new line of English textbooks.

[Middle English adopten, from Old French adopter, from Latin adoptāre : ad-, ad- + optāre, to choose.]

a·dopt′a·bil′i·ty n.
a·dopt′a·ble adj.
a·dopt′er n.
a·dop′tion n.
Usage Note: Children are adopted by parents, and we normally refer to an adopted child but to adoptive parents, families, and homes. When describing places, one can use either adopted or adoptive: her adopted city; her adoptive city.

adoptability

(əˌdɒptəˈbɪlɪtɪ)
n
the quality or extent of being adoptable
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Multicultural society, pluralism in economic and political ideologies and adoptability are the characteristics, which provide catalyst for the development.
Microgrids have been adopted as a modern power system in developed countries while its adoptability in developing countries is yet not encouraging.
Their topics include Spartan luxury: a poetics of finitude and fullness in A Strange and Sublime Address, the truth on common poverty and uncommon wealth in rural Kenya: Stanley Gazemba's The Stone Hills of Maragoli, colonial capitalism's "disvaluation" of indigenous Australians' uncommon wealth: scholarly analysis and literary representations, wards and rewards: adoptability and lost children, and exploring the European common wealth: a Black British literary and artistic tour.
In order to address the environmental and adoptability issues of WSNs, an immuno-inspired Anomaly Detection System (ADS) is proposed in this paper that have learning capability with intelligent and effective matching technique used.
The analysis profiles the 10 most influential medical devices and imaging technologies that stand out for their market adoptability, market potential, intellectual property (IP) activity, application scope, size of innovation ecosystem, amount of R&D funding received, and market readiness.
For the adoptability of novice teachers, organizational support and help form senior teachers may help the incoming faculty to handle unseen problems (Holt, 2011).
Developing a Framework for Assessing Adoptability of Citizen-Focused eGovernment Initiatives in Developing Countries: The Case of Tanzania; Exploratory Phase Results, Proceedings of the 8 (th) European Conference on eGovernment 10-11 July 2008, Ecole Polytechnique, Lausanne, Switzerland.
And once we are into it, there is a strong adoptability by people.
More yield of oat varieties might be due to the more adoptability and better performance of that variety (PD2-LV65) under local agro-ecological conditions than other varieties.
org) have dog walking/running programs designed to socialize, condition, and increase the adoptability of shelter dogs.
The IGP said that the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa police have the inherent capabilities of quick adoptability to the changing environment and expressed good wishes for all the officers in future and stressed the need for taking advantage of their rich experience for the force.