adoptee

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Related to adopted person: Adopted child

a·dop·tee

 (ə-dŏp′tē, ə-dŏp-tē′)
n.
One, such as a child, that is or has been adopted.

a•dopt•ee

(ə dɒpˈti, ˌæd ɒp-)

n.
a person who is adopted.
[1890]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.adoptee - someone (such as a child) who has been adoptedadoptee - someone (such as a child) who has been adopted
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
Translations

adoptee

n (esp US) → Adoptivkind nt
References in periodicals archive ?
The Government's deputy leader told the Irish Mirror: "As an adopted person myself who only discovered the true identity of my parents in the late 1990s, by which time they were dead, I never thought that was right.
Previously only the adopted person and their biological family had this right.
The family loses their birth child and the adopted person always has that loss, too, that they were not raised by their birth family or sometimes even in their birth culture.
The Deputy Minister for Social Services, Gwenda Thomas, said the proposals could be introduced for scenarios where the family of an adopted person would want to contact their birth family for health reasons, such as investigating a hereditary condition.
The Deputy Minister for Social Services, Gwenda Thomas, said the proposals could be introduced for scenarios where the family an adopted person would want to contact their birth family for health reasons, such as investigating a hereditory condition.
Unlike the words "give up," which imply a lack of value or consideration for the adopted person, these phrases retain his or her dignity.
If a woman or couple chooses adoption, FIA works with them through the decision making processes around selecting an adoptive family, and provides lifelong support to all members in the adoptive circle: birth family, adoptive family, and of course, adopted person.
Therefore, the discourse about what the significant and contributing factors are to identity (eg race, ethnicity, culture) and their particular meaning, influence and impact on the transracially adopted person may vary by country, depending on current under standings and dialogues about race, ethnicity and culture in a particular location.
AS an adopted person, I know how important it is for a child to have the love, support and family life my adoptive parents gave me and my sister.
As an adopted person, I am aware of the difficulties an adopted child can have growing up which strengthens my resolve to raise money for this wonderful organisation.
Triseliotis, "Identity Formation and the Adopted Person Revisited," in The Dynamics of Adoption: Social and Personal Perspectives, ed.