adrad

adrad

(əˈdræd)
adj
archaic afraid
References in classic literature ?
`Ouvre,' he cried, `ouvre,' or some such word, making signs for me to open the gate; and then `Merci,' as though he were adrad of me.
The English text remarks twice that Havelok is "sore adrad" (1669, 1682) to dine with Ubbe on account of Goldeboru's safety and stresses his brothers' protection in accompanying them (1690-93).
Suso hasWisdom make such a declaration, (88) and Hoccleve follows suit in his 'Ars vtillissima', having Sapience advise: 'My passioun putte eek twixt my doom and thee, | Lest, more than neede is, adrad thow be.' (89) As a result of this experiential identification, the excesses of emotion that have been aroused by impending death can be calmed.