adsorption


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Related to adsorption: Adsorption chromatography
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adsorption
Toxic gas molecules adhere to the activated charcoal in a gas mask, allowing the person wearing the mask to breathe nontoxic air.

ad·sorp·tion

 (ăd-zôrp′shən, -sôrp′-)
n.
The accumulation of gases, liquids, or solutes on the surface of a solid or liquid.

[From adsorb.]

ad·sorp′tive (-tĭv) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ad•sorp•tion

(ædˈsɔrp ʃən, -ˈzɔrp-)
n.
the process by which an ultrathin layer of one substance forms on the surface of another substance.
[1880–85]
ad•sorp′tive, adj.
ad•sorp′tive•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

ad·sorp·tion

(ăd-sôrp′shən)
The process by which molecules of a substance, such as a gas or a liquid, collect on the surface of another substance, such as a solid. The molecules are attracted to the surface but do not enter the solid's minute spaces, as in absorption. Some drinking water filters consist of carbon cartridges that adsorb contaminants. Compare absorption.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

adsorption

The process by which molecules of gases or liquids become attached to the surface of another substance. Desorption is the opposite process.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.adsorption - the accumulation of molecules of a gas to form a thin film on the surface of a solid
chemisorption, chemosorption - adsorption (especially when irreversible) by means of chemical instead of physical forces; "chemisorption of gaseous nitrogen on iron catalysts"
sorption - the process in which one substance takes up or holds another (by either absorption or adsorption)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
adsorpcija
adsorpsjon

adsorption

nAdsorption f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

ad·sorp·tion

n. adsorción, adherencia de un gas o líquido a una superficie sólida.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Summary: As the number of patients are suffering from various diseases related to blood is increasing in various geographical region will increase the demand of adsorption apheresis devices market.
Conventional methods of removing the excess heavy metals in aqueous solutions include adsorption, precipitation, membrane separation and ion exchange [9-12].
[USPRwire, Tue Mar 19 2019] Adsorption apheresis devices is used for separation of blood component from blood, so that each component can be used for medical treatment.
The present study focuses on the characterization of the Corallina Elongata (CE) alga and its adsorption performance for Methylene Blue (MB), this alga is found in abundance at the Mediterranean coast of the city of Jijel in eastern Algeria.
Transitional metal adsorption in variable charge soils have been well studied by several authors [1, 2] but has not been treated for the case of calcined substrates prepared with oxidic refractory lithological materials.
Mechanism of adsorption was revealed using Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin adsorption model.
The scientists found that defatted rice bran had the highest adsorption capacity for tea catechins and the best selectivity for (-)-epigallocatechin gallate, a phenolic antioxidant, over total catechins among water-washed rice bran and untreated rice bran.
Then, a gas adsorption coefficient is determined in the laboratory, and the gas content is calculated.
In this process, surfactant loss reduces the availability of the surfactants for solubilization because of adsorption to soils and sediments [2].
The ongoing use of fossil fuels makes it compelling to store C[H.sub.4] via the adsorption technology.
In this context, agrowastes are considered a significant material for adsorption. Binding capacity of these materials can be intensified by physical and chemical treatments and heat therapy [8].