adsum


Also found in: Acronyms.

adsum

(ˈædˌsʊm)
sentence substitute
I am present
[Latin]
References in classic literature ?
The burden is no longer heavy when we have for our past troubles only the same sweet mingling of pleasure and pity that we feel when old knight-hearted Colonel Newcome answers " adsum " to the great roll-call, or when Tom and Maggie Tulliver, clasping hands through the mists that have divided them, go down, locked in each other's arms, beneath the swollen waters of the Floss.
He bore on a white shield a black bull's head, half defaced by the numerous encounters which he had undergone, and bearing the arrogant motto, Cave, Adsum. Over this champion the Disinherited Knight obtained a slight but decisive advantage.
Roughly speaking, however, had Figgis been there in person and called a roll call, half the ladies and gentlemen present would have said: "Adsum; I'm here, in place of my grandfather or great-grandfather," as the case might be.
Adlington translates En adsum tuis commota, Luci, precibus, rerum naturae parens as 'Behold Lucius I am come, thy weeping and prayers hath mooved mee to succour thee.
Of course, we laughed, as children will, at the age-old jokes inherent in mock Latin sentences: "Caesar adsum iam forte, Brutus aderat, Caesar sic in omnibus, Brutus sic inat".
An offstage speech (of Jupiter), prefaced by a reassuring "Bono animo es, adsum auxilio, Amphitruo, tibi et tuis:/ nihil est quod timeas" (5.1131-132), "I am here with aid, Amphtriyon, for thee and thine," and you have "naught to fear," cancels out appraisals that would lead to home destroying jealousy and anger (Plautus 1997, 120-121).
"prior," inquit "ego adsum. cur timeam dubitemve locum defendere?