adulterously


Also found in: Thesaurus.

a·dul·ter·ous

 (ə-dŭl′tər-əs, -trəs)
adj.
Relating to, inclined to, or marked by adultery.

a·dul′ter·ous·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.adulterously - in an adulterous manneradulterously - in an adulterous manner; "he behaved adulterously"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
at 8 (reflecting "the Orthodox desire to prevent the birth of children conceived adulterously").
According to Justice Scalia, if "there were no societal tradition, either way, regarding the rights of the natural father of a child adulterously conceived, [the Court] would have to consult, and (if possible) reason from, the traditions regarding natural fathers in general." As Justice Scalia states the problem, after traditions regarding the rights of the natural father of a child adulterously conceived, traditions regarding natural fathers in general are the next most specific.
In a footnote (joined only by Chief Justice Rehnquist), Justice Scalia explained that, in substantive due process cases, the Court must "refer to the most specific level at which a relevant tradition protecting, or denying protection to, the asserted right can be identified." (79) Justice Scalia elaborated that "[i]f, for example, there were no societal tradition, either way, regarding the rights of the natural father of a child adulterously conceived, we would have to consult, and (if possible) reason from, the traditions regarding natural fathers in general." (80) But since "a more specific tradition ...
No matter how one maculates his soul, living riotously, adulterously, being a kidnapper, kleptomaniac, avaricious, upstart, drunkard, etc., so great is the power of divine love and forgiveness that God cleanses all these with His generosity, casting them forever in great oblivion and revealing more brightly than the sun itself the man who displays his will to repent.
The now stoical Bloom can harbor little or no resentment for Boylan, seeing the outrage of institutional matrimony evened out by the outrage of adultery: "the matrimonial violator of the matrimony had not been outraged by the adulterous violator of the adulterously violated" (Joyce 866).
(37) The Court framed the issue by asking whether society has traditionally protected the rights of the natural father of an adulterously conceived child, concluding that it has not.
From outrage (matrimony) to outrage (adultery) there arose nought but outrage (copulation) yet the matrimonial violator of the matrimonially violated had not been outraged by the adulterous violator of the adulterously violated (17.