adultress

adultress

(əˈdʌltrɪs)
n
a female adulterer
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Revered by some as the rightful Queen of England, reviled by others as a murderous adultress, her long and fascinating rivalry with her cousin Elizabeth I led ultimately to her downfall.
How inconsistent is this!...The Request comes very naturally from the Queen in the Novel, and the King's Compliance with it is very well accounted for, but in the Play nothing can be more absurd than that the King should be reasonable enough to consult voluntarily the Gods concerning the Infidelity of his Wife; and while the Answer was expected, and her Guilt yet doubtful, punish her with as much Rigour as if the Oracle had declared her an Adultress. Here again the paltry Story has the Advantage of the Play.
Incredulous at Goneril's inhospitality to his knights, Lear threatens Regan as he had earlier threatened Cordelia, claiming that he would doubt her paternity if she did likewise--"I would divorce me from thy mother's tomb,/Sepulchring an adultress," since according to his "nothing comes from nothing" schema, her fault must spring from a natural source like heredity (2.2.303-04).
Without expressly accusing Zoe of murder Gibbon slips into his sentence on the coronation of Michael IV an old Roman saying that "every adultress is capable of poisoning her husband." The caliph Soliman, reported to have died of indigestion, becomes for Gibbon an allegory of gluttony: "In one of his pilgrimages to Mecca, Soliman ate, at a single meal, seventy pomegranates, a kid, six fowls, and a huge quantity of the grapes of Tayef.
Perhaps most notable was filmmaker Marcel Carne's 1953 version, ''The Adultress,'' starring Simone Signoret and Raf Vallone.
Famously, in 1801 she reported seeing Cassandra Ricketts, who had been divorced by her husband for her affair with a member of Parliament, and commented to Cassandra that "I am proud to say that I have a very good eye at an Adultress" (12 May 1801).
Historians have argued for centuries over whether Mary was a shameless adultress who conspired to murder Darnley.
"I am proud to say," reported Austen to her sister Cassandra, "that I have a very good eye at an Adultress, for tho' repeatedly assured that another in the same party was the She, I fixed upon the right one from the first ...
Which 1850 novel by Nathaniel Hawthorne features an adultress in seventeenth-century New England?
For a start, she was an alleged adultress who was named as the person who broke up the seemingly fairy-tale marriage of Eddie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds.
--Even though the Passion play traditions from Chester do not dwell on Jesus' public actions, the Chester-play and the movie both integrate the episode of the adultress (John 8:1-11) as a crucial scene in Jesus' public ministry.