adverbial


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ad·ver·bi·al

 (ăd-vûr′bē-əl)
adj.
Of, relating to, or being an adverb.
n.
An adverbial element or phrase.

ad·ver′bi·al·ly adv.

adverbial

(ædˈvɜːbɪəl)
n
(Grammar) a word or group of words playing the grammatical role of an adverb, such as in the rain in the sentence I'm singing in the rain
adj
(Grammar) of or relating to an adverb or adverbial
adˈverbially adv

ad•ver•bi•al

(ædˈvɜr bi əl)

adj.
1. of, functioning as, or forming an adverb.
n.
2. a word or group of words functioning as an adverb.
[1605–15]
ad•ver′bi•al•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.adverbial - a word or group of words function as an adverb
adverb - a word that modifies something other than a noun
Adj.1.adverbial - of or relating to or functioning as an adverb; "adverbial syntax"
Translations
ظَرْفِي
příslovečný
adverbiel
adverbanpriložni
határozói
atviksorîs-; atvikslegur
adverbial
príslovkový
zarf niteliğindezarfımsı

adverbial

[ədˈvɜːbɪəl] ADJadverbial

adverbial

[ədˈvɜːrbiəl] adj [expression] → adverbial(e)

adverbial

adj, adverbially
advadverbial

adverbial

[ædˈvɜːbɪəl] adjavverbiale

adverb

(ˈӕdvəːb) noun
a word used before or after a verb, before an adjective or preposition, or with another adverb to show time, manner, place, degree etc. Yesterday he looked more carefully in the box, and there he found a very small key with a hole right through it.
adˈverbial adjective
adˈverbially adverb

adverbial

a. adverbial.
References in periodicals archive ?
Leaving aside the diachronic component, these subject-related words are morphologically, syntactically and semantically different from '-ly' adjectives of the type described in point i) of section 1: morphologically, because, unlike '-ly' adjectives of the type described in i), subject-related words systematically have an adjectival base without '-ly'; syntactically, because they express a predication at a secondary clause level, and therefore retain adverbial mobility and optionality even if they do not express a circumstance of time, manner or reason of the predication (however, they cannot express predication at a primary clause level, i.e.
In discussing the adverbial theory, Fish distinguishes event analyses from subject-predicate analyses of statements about experience.
A common colour code is green for verbs and verb groups, red for subject and object/complement (called participants in functional grammar) and blue for adverbs and adverbial phrases showing circumstances.
Thus, de Vega, Rinck, Diaz and Leon (2007) found that while-sentences were read faster and judged as more sensible when the long-duration event was placed in the adverbial clause, playing the role of ground, and the short-duration event was in the main clause as the figure (e.g., While John was writing a letter, Mary came into the room) than vice versa (While Mary was coming into the room, John wrote a letter).
jagmur) can optionally take an adverbial accusative (5) (Richtungsakkusativ or accusative of goal) specifying the destination of the verbal action:
Summing up, we will be testing for the role that aspectuality, affectedness, adverbial modification and definiteness of the subject play in middle acceptability.
(3) In Hungarian, essive functions are distributed over three different adverbial case forms: the essive-formal in -kent, the essive-modal in -Ul, and the modalessive in -(A)n.
On the other hand, adverbial clauses and phrases attach to already complete clauses.
government recognising adverbial important thinking Grey Her union - the National Association of Head Teachers - put her "error of judgement" down to stress, after an inspection by the education watchdog, Ofsted, three years earlier said the school had "serious weaknesses".
Which, much like an overwrought fronted adverbial, they consider as completely 'back-to-front'.