adverbial

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ad·ver·bi·al

 (ăd-vûr′bē-əl)
adj.
Of, relating to, or being an adverb.
n.
An adverbial element or phrase.

ad·ver′bi·al·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

adverbial

(ædˈvɜːbɪəl)
n
(Grammar) a word or group of words playing the grammatical role of an adverb, such as in the rain in the sentence I'm singing in the rain
adj
(Grammar) of or relating to an adverb or adverbial
adˈverbially adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ad•ver•bi•al

(ædˈvɜr bi əl)

adj.
1. of, functioning as, or forming an adverb.
n.
2. a word or group of words functioning as an adverb.
[1605–15]
ad•ver′bi•al•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.adverbial - a word or group of words function as an adverb
adverb - a word that modifies something other than a noun
Adj.1.adverbial - of or relating to or functioning as an adverb; "adverbial syntax"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
ظَرْفِي
příslovečný
adverbiel
adverbanpriložni
határozói
atviksorîs-; atvikslegur
adverbial
príslovkový
zarf niteliğindezarfımsı

adverbial

[ədˈvɜːbɪəl] ADJadverbial
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

adverbial

[ədˈvɜːrbiəl] adj [expression] → adverbial(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

adverbial

adj, adverbially
advadverbial
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

adverbial

[ædˈvɜːbɪəl] adjavverbiale
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

adverb

(ˈӕdvəːb) noun
a word used before or after a verb, before an adjective or preposition, or with another adverb to show time, manner, place, degree etc. Yesterday he looked more carefully in the box, and there he found a very small key with a hole right through it.
adˈverbial adjective
adˈverbially adverb
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

adverbial

a. adverbial.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
While the locative meaning is still present in adverbials like e.g.
Instead, it has become about sounding out nonsense words, fronted adverbials, booster classes and endless rounds of mind-numbing tests.
A group of parents has decided they will attend the same school as their children - Blackrod Primary in Bolton - and study the year six (top of juniors) curriculum to see what their offspring learn all day, fronted adverbials and all.
That she had, by some miracle, managed to make a living as an author, despite having NEVER heard of 'fronted adverbials'!
Turning to the question of the relevance of adverbials in the expression of perfect meaning, Table 2 below gives the raw numbers and percentages for the use of adverbial support, that is, the distribution of verbal forms with and without the presence of an adverbial of time, by geographical variety.
This means that these texts are situation- dependent and are loaded with the features of many adverbials used for deixis, as mentioned above.
Conrad and Biber's (2000) analyzed the stance adverbials, which they define as "grammatical devices used to frame a proposition" (Conrad and Biber 2000: 58).
Pronominals and adverbials, on the other hand, exert a more active role.
Among the topics are a grammatical sketch, segmental phonology, nominal and adjectival compounds, ideophones and onomatopoeia, postpositions and adverbials, verbal derivation, verb phrases and predicate structure, relativization and clause nominalization, clause chaining and subordination, quotative constructions, and grammatical pragmatics.