adverse


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Related to adverse: averse, Adverse Action

ad·verse

 (ăd-vûrs′, ăd′vûrs′)
adj.
1. Acting or serving to oppose; antagonistic: adverse criticism.
2. Contrary to one's interests or welfare; harmful or unfavorable: adverse circumstances.
3. Moving in an opposite or opposing direction: adverse currents.

[Middle English, from Old French advers, from Latin adversus, past participle of advertere, to turn toward : ad-, ad- + vertere, to turn; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

ad·verse′ly adv.
ad·verse′ness n.

adverse

(ˈædvɜːs; ædˈvɜːs)
adj
1. antagonistic or inimical; hostile: adverse criticism.
2. unfavourable to one's interests: adverse circumstances.
3. contrary or opposite in direction or position: adverse winds.
4. (Botany) (of leaves, flowers, etc) facing the main stem. Compare averse2
[C14: from Latin adversus opposed to, hostile, from advertere to turn towards, from ad- to, towards + vertere to turn]
adˈversely adv
adˈverseness n

ad•verse

(ædˈvɜrs, ˈæd vɜrs)

adj.
1. unfavorable or antagonistic: adverse criticism.
2. opposing one's interests or wishes: adverse circumstances.
3. being in an opposite direction: adverse winds.
[1350–1400; < Anglo-French, Old French advers < Latin adversus hostile, past participle of advertere=ad- ad- + vertere to turn]
ad•verse′ly, adv.
ad•verse′ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.adverse - contrary to your interests or welfareadverse - contrary to your interests or welfare; "adverse circumstances"; "made a place for themselves under the most untoward conditions"
unfavorable, unfavourable - not encouraging or approving or pleasing; "unfavorable conditions"; "an unfavorable comparison"; "unfavorable comments", "unfavorable impression"
2.adverse - in an opposing directionadverse - in an opposing direction; "adverse currents"; "a contrary wind"
unfavorable, unfavourable - (of winds or weather) tending to hinder or oppose; "unfavorable winds"

adverse

adjective
2. unfavourable, bad, threatening, hostile, unfortunate, unlucky, ominous, unfriendly, untimely, unsuited, ill-suited, inopportune, disadvantageous, unseasonable Despite the adverse conditions, the road was finished in just eight months.
3. negative, opposing, reluctant, hostile, contrary, dissenting, unwilling, unfriendly, unsympathetic, ill-disposed Wine lakes and butter mountains have drawn considerable adverse publicity.

adverse

adjective
1. Acting against or in opposition:
2. Tending to discourage, retard, or make more difficult:
Translations
مُنَاوِئ، مُعَاد، مُعَاكِس
nepříznivý
fjendtlignegativugunstig
neikvæîur, óhagstæîur
nelaimėnepalankuspriešiškaipriešiškassunkus išmėginimas
naidīgsnelabvēlīgs
nepriaznivý

adverse

[ˈædvɜːs] ADJ [criticism, decision, effect, wind] → adverso, contrario; [conditions] → adverso, desfavorable
to be adverse toser contrario a, estar en contra de

adverse

[ˈædvɜːrs] adj [effect] → négatif/ive; [circumstances, conditions] → défavorable; [publicity] → mauvais(e); [reaction] → indésirable
Despite the adverse publicity, the new road went ahead → En dépit de la mauvaise publicité, la construction de la nouvelle route s'est poursuivie.
adverse to → hostile à
under adverse circumstances → dans des conditions défavorables
to have an adverse effect on sth → avoir un effet négatif sur qch
the adverse effects of smoking
BUT les effets nocifs de la cigarette.

adverse

adjungünstig; criticism, comment also, reactionnegativ, ablehnend; wind, conditions alsowidrig; effect alsonachteilig

adverse

[ˈædvɜːs] adj (criticism, decision, effect) → sfavorevole; (wind) → contrario/a
adverse to → contrario/a a
adverse weather conditions → condizioni atmosferiche avverse
in adverse circumstances → nelle avversità

adverse

(ˈӕdvəːs) adjective
unfavourable. adverse criticism.
ˈadversely adverb
adˈversity noun
misfortune or hardship.

adverse

a. desfavorable, adverso-a, contrario-a, opuesto-a;
___ effectsefectos ___;
___ reactionreacción ___.

adverse

adj adverso
References in classic literature ?
And whoever shall fortify his town well, and shall have managed the other concerns of his subjects in the way stated above, and to be often repeated, will never be attacked without great caution, for men are always adverse to enterprises where difficulties can be seen, and it will be seen not to be an easy thing to attack one who has his town well fortified, and is not hated by his people.
Pennsylvania may not choose to confound her interests in a connection so adverse to her policy.
Critics, he says, jump at certain groundless conclusions; they pass adverse judgment and then proceed to reason on it; and, assuming that the poet has said whatever they happen to think, find fault if a thing is inconsistent with their own fancy.
The oaths also which they take in an oligarchy ought to be contrary to what they now are; for, at present, in some places they swear, "I will be adverse to the common people, and contrive all I can against them;" whereas they ought rather to suppose and pretend the contrary; expressing in their oaths, that they will not injure the people.
Robert had tried to hold his place in the world, but adverse fortune kept him down.
But I have no sympathy with the purely selfish pleasure which some men appear to derive from dwelling on the minute anatomy of their own feelings, under the pr essure of adverse fortune.
Once did I long for happy auspices: then did ye lead an owl-monster across my path, an adverse sign.
Were the plan of the convention adverse to the public happiness, my voice would be, Reject the plan.
I sent them to carry aid to King Charles and they performed prodigies to save him; had it not been for an adverse destiny, that beloved monarch would this day have been among us.
The approach of night put an end to the skirmishing fire of the adverse parties, and the savages drew off without renewing their hostilities.
The list of the saved, as collected by the people of the whaler, is not vouched for as being absolutely correct, the circumstances having been adverse to investigation.
as Mr Dennis swore) the greatest possible curse a civilised community could know, and militating more against the professional emoluments and usefulness of the great constitutional office he had the honour to hold, than any adverse circumstances that could present themselves to his imagination.