advisee


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ad·vi·see

 (ăd-vī-zē′)
n.
One that is advised.

advisee

(ˌædvaɪˈziː)
n
formal a person who receives advice from another person
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.advisee - someone who receives adviceadvisee - someone who receives advice    
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
References in periodicals archive ?
Please note that male participants received scripts and instructions indicating that the advisee was female (i.e., word "her" was used to describe possession by the target) and a stereotypical female name was used in the script (i.e., Josie), however female participants received scripts and instructions indicating that the advisee was male (i.e., word "his" was used to describe possession by the target) and a stereotypical male name was used in the script (i.e., Jeffrey).
A total of 93 complete (32% response rate) and six partial questionnaires were received for the advisee group.
An advisee of the first author is beginning her second semester of a master's degree program in professional counseling with an emphasis in mental health counseling.
Teachers described key program elements, among them project-based learning; integration of music, theater, poetry and other arts; a multi-age "advisee" class for social problem- solving and decision-making; and a partnership with Pacific University that would bring in student teachers and the expertise of professors.
Please advisee. AM, Doha A: According to Article 10 of the Labour Law, subject to the provisions of Article 113, the right to file a lawsuit for a claim of the entitlements, accruing under the provisions of the law or the service contract shall lapse only by the expiry of one year from the date of expiry of the contract.
This study will explore how advisor and advisee mentoring relationships impact underrepresented minority students' experiences in science graduate programs.
But some are less anticipated, such as when a mentee engages in reverse mentoring, becoming the advisor instead of the advisee and the more seasoned professional is the one who becomes the beneficiary.
Throughout the years with my advisor, our relationship and friendship developed beyond the basic advisor and advisee meetings.
For example, Jones and Gordon (1972) had participants rate the likability of a target person (advisee) who was having their first advising meeting with their academic advisor in which the advisee talked about past life events.
The first is the advisor's practice of attention, an activity that forms the basis of a trusting relationship and that does justice to the advisee. The second is helping advisees discern their vocation, or life goal, which students need in order to make rational decisions about their academic and post-academic careers.
This past fall, I cotaught a course in European cultural studies with my graduate advisee, Chad Cordova.