advocation


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ad·vo·cate

 (ăd′və-kāt′)
v. ad·vo·cat·ed, ad·vo·cat·ing, ad·vo·cates
v.tr.
To speak, plead, or argue in favor of: advocate a vegan diet. See Synonyms at support.
v.intr.
Usage Problem To act as an advocate: advocated for her patients; advocated for more stringent crime laws.
n. (-kĭt)
1. One that argues for a cause; a supporter or defender: an advocate of civil rights.
2. One that pleads in another's behalf; an intercessor: advocates for abused children and spouses.
3. A lawyer.

[From Middle English advocat, lawyer, from Old French advocat, from Latin advocātus, past participle of advocāre, to summon for counsel : ad-, ad- + vocāre, to call; see wekw- in Indo-European roots.]

ad′vo·ca′tion n.
ad′vo·ca′tive, ad·voc′a·to′ry (ăd-vŏk′ə-tôr′ē, ăd′və-kə-) adj.
ad′vo·ca′tor n.
Usage Note: The standard form of the verb advocate is transitive, meaning "endorse" or "argue for," as in The teacher advocated a new educational technique, which was accepted by 85 percent of the Usage Panel in our 2014 survey. Many readers balk when the verb is used to express the same meaning in an intransitive form with the preposition for: less than half (45 percent) of the Panel approved of The teacher advocated for a new educational technique. The intransitive is more acceptable, however, when the object of for is the beneficiary of the advocacy rather than the idea or action being advocated: two-thirds of the Panel approved The teacher advocated for her at-risk students. A careful writer will use transitive advocate in sentences indicating the idea or action, restricting the intransitive to sentences indicating the beneficiaries.

advocation

(ˌædvəˈkeɪʃən)
n
(Law) Scots law papal law the transfer to itself by a superior court of an action pending in a lower court
References in periodicals archive ?
Advocation of veganism by consumers as well as the production of plant meats by food manufacturers is expected to bode well for the market from 2018 to 2023 (forecast period).
hearing advocation organization called Action on Hearing Loss or AHL, stated that the findings of the study indicate how hearing loss can be caused by more than just environmental factors.
This is in no way an advocation of complete openness to international markets when industries are in their infancy stage ...
The European Photonics Industry Consortium (EPIC) has announced its advocation for a photonics contractual public private partnership (cPPP) to be selected for funding under the future Horizon Europe 2021-2027 programme.
EPIC has therefore announced its advocation for a future Photonics cPPP, which it has done so in the clear knowledge that such a cPPP will meet criteria of the European Research Area and Innovation Committee.
Narayan's advocation for everyday creativity ensures that the voices of her interlocutors--the women with whom she conducts her research--are not subsumed by anthropological theory.
This church, under the advocation of San Joaquin or Saint Joachim, father of the Blessed Virgin Mary, replaced the older one dedicated to the 'Dulce Nombre de Jesus' (Sweet Name of Jesus), described by Augustinian priest Manuel Buzeta in the mid-19th century as 'mediana fabrica,' or not in good condition.
But a third, the PKK or the Kurdistan Workers' Party, has been banned since 2001 for its advocation of Kurdish selfrule through both political and armed struggle.
My interest and tireless advocation for vegetarianism have convinced several family members and friends to try more meatless options as well.
However, Sharp's incisive discussion of Angel Island's seemingly "positive" though questionably reductive understanding of--and advocation for--racial and species mixing brings a much-needed analytical "balance" to the white eugenic feminisms narratively instantiated in Mizora and Herland.
JG is planning to expand the IHS Horn Vets team to an even more international level by continuing to increase the advocation of Horn veterans.