aerobot


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aerobot

(ˈɛərəʊˌbɒt)
n
an unmanned aircraft used esp in space exploration
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Aeromexico has introduced Aerobot, its Artificial Intelligence (AI) customer service chatbot, with the help of its chatbot development partners at Yalochat.com and IV.AI, the company said.
Intellibot has developed three machines to serve different cleaning needs: Hydrobot - scrubber for hard surfaces; Duobot - sweeper/scrubber for hard surfaces; and AeroBot - true vacuum for carpeted surfaces.
Corke, "System identification and control of an aerobot drive system," in Proceedings of the Information, Decision and Control Conference (IDC '07), pp.
[5] Kampke, T., Elfes, A., "Optimal aerobot trajectory planning for wind-based opportunistic flight control", Proceedings of the International Conference of Intelligent Robots and Systems IROS, Las Vegas, 2003, # 862.
The airborne platform could be a propeller driven aerobot that can move to specific targets on Titan, or a combined airship-rover, or a station-keeping aerobot that winches down an instrumented platform.
M2 EQUITYBITES-December 8, 2016-Aeromexico launches conversational commerce with Aerobot
Autonomy will be the central capability for enabling long-term scientific studies of a decade or more, currently prohibited by cost, and enabling new classes of missions that inherently must be executed without the benefit of ground support, either because of control challenges, for example, small-body (asteroid and comet) rendezvous and landing missions or because of the impossibility of communication for extended periods, for example, an underice explorer at Europa or a Titan aerobot. The vision for future NASA missions based on intelligent space platforms is tremendously exciting.
Most robotic planetary space missions exploring surface and atmosphere involve mobility provided by a rover or by aerial vehicles like balloons and aerobots.
the Moon, a solar sailing satellite, the next generation of space telescopes using small satellites to assemble a large aperture in space and even aerobots for flying on Mars.
The answer is unmanned "aerobots," revolutionary equipment that makes "guided missiles look like nutcrackers." Explaining the purity and beauty of their conception and execution, Hollander seems to glow not so much with pride but with sheer intellectual zeal.