aerodynamics

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aerodynamics
top: high drag on a less aerodynamic shape
bottom: low drag on a more aerodynamic shape

aer·o·dy·nam·ics

 (âr′ō-dī-năm′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The dynamics of bodies moving relative to gases, especially the interaction of moving objects with the atmosphere.

aer′o·dy·nam′i·cist (-ĭ-sĭst) n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

aerodynamics

(ˌɛərəʊdaɪˈnæmɪks)
n
(General Physics) (functioning as singular) the study of the dynamics of gases, esp of the forces acting on a body passing through air. Compare aerostatics1
ˌaerodyˈnamic adj
ˌaerodyˈnamically adv
ˌaerodyˈnamicist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

aer•o•dy•nam•ics

(ˌɛər oʊ daɪˈnæm ɪks)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
the study of the motion of air and other gases and of the effects of such motion on bodies in the gas.
[1830–40]
aer`o•dy•nam′ic, aer`o•dy•nam′i•cal, adj.
aer`o•dy•nam′i•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

aer·o·dy·nam·ics

(âr′ō-dī-năm′ĭks)
The study of the movement of air and other gases and of the forces involved in their movements. It is also the study of the way objects, such as cars and airplanes, interact with air when they are moving through it.
Did You Know? The two primary forces in aerodynamics are lift and drag. Lift refers to forces perpendicular to the surface of an object (such as an airplane wing) that is traveling through the air. For example, airplane wings are designed so that when they move through the air, an area of low pressure is created above the wing; the low pressure produces a lift force that pulls the wing upward (in a direction perpendicular to the wing's broad surface), and the wing pulls the airplane up with it. Drag forces, which are parallel to the object's surface, are usually caused by friction. Drag makes it more difficult for airplane wings to slice through the air, and so drag forces push against the forward motion of the craft. Large wings usually generate a lot of lift, but they also produce a lot of drag. In designing airplane wings, engineers need to take into account such factors as the speed and altitude at which the plane will fly, so that they can find a wing shape that balances lift and drag as well as possible.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

aerodynamics

the branch of dynamics that studies the motions of air and other gases, especially with regard to bodies in motion in these substances. See also aviation. — aerodynamic, aerodynamical, adj.
See also: Atmosphere
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

aerodynamics

The study of the flow of gases, especially air.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aerodynamics - the branch of mechanics that deals with the motion of gases (especially air) and their effects on bodies in the flowaerodynamics - the branch of mechanics that deals with the motion of gases (especially air) and their effects on bodies in the flow
mechanics - the branch of physics concerned with the motion of bodies in a frame of reference
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
aerodynamika
aerodinamika

aerodynamics

[ˈɛərəʊdaɪˈnæmɪks] Naerodinámica fsing
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

aerodynamics

[ˌɛərəʊdaɪˈnæmɪks] naérodynamique f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

aerodynamics

n
sing (subject) → Aerodynamik f
pl (of plane etc)Aerodynamik f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

aerodynamics

[ˈɛərəʊdaɪˈnæmɪks] nsgaerodinamica
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
My stand out memory was being tasked with reducing race pit-stop times (the time taken to change all four tyres on a car during a race).This involved working with the mechanics, the design engineers, the aerodynamicists and the drivers and their race engineers analysing hours of footage just to shave off 1 second per pit-stop.
Dyson's team of aerodynamicists used this principle to create a way to style hair using only air, combined with heat.
As well as the potential for meteorological sensing, this work is of interest to the avian ecology and behavior communities and to aerodynamicists interested in developing airborne robotics to mimic aspects of bird flight.
Vehicle aerodynamicists have also been rummaging through the 488 Challenge spare parts box, the most notable bodywork tweaks being the new front and rear diffusers, which increase downforce by up to 20 percent.
"It took quite a bit of study by the aerodynamicists, but the designers had to work hard to modify the chassis so the halo could survive the mandated loads.
Bloodhound has also revealed the rich choice of future career options, and she enjoyed speaking to aerodynamicists and other researchers about the breadth of engineering jobs available.
The problem is that the aerodynamicists then looked at it and said 'well, that affects the rear wing, so we don't want that'.
He's (Brown) obviously signed a major sponsor for next year that he's trying to get as much coverage as he can for, so McLaren presented another variant," said Horner adding that 'problem is the aerodynamicists' then looked at it and said 'well that screws up the rear wing so we don't want that.' So I'm not quite sure as we sit here what we've got.
"These are top-class engineers, aerodynamicists, vehicle dynamics engineers - the skill level is high and we need to maintain and we need to maintain access to that talent."
Therefore, the ability to predict the self-soiling phenomenon early in a vehicle development programme would provide a useful insight and allow designers and aerodynamicists the opportunity to resolve soiling issues alongside the more usual areas of concern such as drag reduction, aero-acoustics and cross-wind stability.
Developed in the 1980s at the Air Force Research Laboratory by five computer scientists who were also aerodynamicists, the system was designed to automatically fly an airplane away from a hazardous situation, preventing the loss of the pilot and aircraft.
After every race I am in the factory, debriefing, engineering and working with the aerodynamicists closely.