aeroelastic


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aeroelastic

(ˌɛərəʊɪˈlæstɪk)
adj
capable of changing shape under aerodynamic forces
References in periodicals archive ?
The efforts have been devoted to energy harvesting from airfoil aeroelastic flutter [68, 123], VIV [141, 142], and galloping [143].
With the increase of the flight speed of modern flight vehicles, panel flutter, a localized aeroelastic problem representing a small portion of the skin on the surface of hypersonic vehicles, is attracting more and more attentions.
This technique, successfully implemented for the suppression of aeroelastic instabilities, will be adapted to machine tool vibrations, first analytically and then experimentally, paving the way to the industrial exploitation of the obtained results.
This workshop will address Wind Turbine Blade Design: Practices, Challenges and Future Developments; Wind Turbine Blade Certification: Walk-through of the IEC 61400 certification process; and Wind Turbine Blade Design and Simulation: Overview of blade design tools and introduction to aeroelastic load simulations and design loads for wind turbine certification.
It is well known that two-dimensional bluff bodies in a cross-flow are subject to typical aeroelastic phenomena like vortex shedding, galloping, flutter, and buffeting.
Imregun, "Aeroelastic stability analysis of a bird-damaged aeroengine fan assembly," Aerospace Science and Technology, vol.
They used a term, so-called passive damping, and marked it as the critical parameter for improving dynamic performance of flexible structures from the point of view of fatigue, aeroelastic stability, and accurate positioning of some specific devices and sensors in micromechanics.
Friedmann, "Aeroelastic and aerothermoelastic analysis in hypersonic flow: Past, present, and future," AIAA Journal, vol.
There is increasing evidence that todays turbojet technology is limited by instabilities arising from non-linear coupling between aerodynamic, aeroelastic and aeroacoustic phenomena.
However, the impact of hood compliance is not easily handled in the early stages of design due to: (1) the potential for aeroelastic interactions; (2) tight margins on allowable hood deflection, (3) the high cost of prototyping and experimentation, and (4) the fact that sub-discipline modeling errors tend to aggregate in coupled systems.
Among his topics are vectors and vector resolution; aerodynamic velocity, inertial velocity, wash velocity, and gusts; aerodynamics of airfoils, wings, and fins; introduction to aeroelastic rotor models; and landing gear.
"Ultralight, tunable, aeroelastic structures and flight controls open up whole new frontiers for flight," relates Gonzalo Rey, chief technology officer for Moog Inc., a precision aircraft motion-controls company.