aerogramme

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aer·o·gram

also aer·o·gramme  (âr′ə-grăm′)
n.
An airmail letter in the form of a lightweight sheet of stationery that folds into its own envelope for mailing at a low postage rate. Also called air letter.

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aerogramme - a letter sent by air mailaerogramme - a letter sent by air mail    
letter, missive - a written message addressed to a person or organization; "mailed an indignant letter to the editor"
Translations
Aerogramm

aerogramme

nAerogramm nt, → Luftpostbrief m

aerogramme

[ˈɛərəʊˌgræm] naerogramma m
References in periodicals archive ?
She was followed by Lionel Blower with 15 sheets of Aerogrammes from Nepal.
'Letters from our dear ones in Pakistan written on blue aerogrammes were eagerly awaited every day by every one of us.
At the five-day Sharjah Stamp Exhibition (SSE), which opened at Mega Mall on Tuesday, collectors and exhibitors from 17 countries gathered to showcase different cultures and traditions as they developed over the last century and a half through stamps, postcards and aerogrammes.
Her follow-up book Aerogrammes and Other Stories focused on young men and women around the world and their struggles with life.
The "blueys" got their name from the blue aerogrammes traditionally sent to those in the armed forces.
How much each of the GCC states is indebted to India for postal operations at least until the beginning of the mid 50s is clearly evident from mails and aerogrammes on 15 display panels that make up Uexkull's collections.
She uses watercolors, oil paints, acrylic on canvas, old cassettes, old paper, printed books, stamps, aerogrammes, envelopes, metal boxes and wooden scales to create an imagery of familiar faces and spaces that creates a dialog between individual memories and collective spaces.
When British Forces are deployed on operations they are entitled to free aerogrammes (known as "blueys" because of their colour) to and from their families and friends.
In Italy in 1971-72, Ornstein communicated daily with his girlfriend--by airmail letters called aerogrammes. He waited eagerly each day for a letter to arrive (given the Italian postal service, the success rate was fairly low).
I went inside, bought some aerogrammes with His Majesty's profile prominently inked in red on fight blue paper.
After all, I had been lodged in a small village on the northwest corner of India's diamond shape, a twelve-hour drive from the Pakistan border, nearly exactly on the other side of the globe from my father and grandmother, to whom I used to write long aerogrammes on flimsy blue paper that could take two to three weeks to arrive.