aerophyte


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Related to aerophyte: psammophyte, Lithophytes

aer·o·phyte

 (âr′ə-fīt′)
n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

aerophyte

(ˈɛərəˌfaɪt)
n
(Botany) another name for epiphyte
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aerophyte - plant that derives moisture and nutrients from the air and rainaerophyte - plant that derives moisture and nutrients from the air and rain; usually grows on another plant but not parasitic on it
plant life, flora, plant - (botany) a living organism lacking the power of locomotion
Clusia insignis, waxflower - epiphytic clusia of British Guiana
black moss, long moss, old man's beard, Spanish moss, Tillandsia usneoides - dense festoons of greenish-grey hairlike flexuous strands anchored to tree trunks and branches by sparse wiry roots; southeastern United States and West Indies to South America
aeschynanthus - a plant of the genus Aeschynanthus having somewhat red or orange flowers and seeds having distinctive hairs at base and apex
hemiepiphyte, semiepiphyte - a plant that is an epiphyte for part of its life
strangler, strangler tree - an epiphytic vine or tree whose aerial roots extend down the trunk of a supporting tree and coalesce around it eventually strangling the tree
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
When a different life-form was reported for a species, we translated it back to Raunkiaer's original system: aerophytes, epiphytes and hemiparasites were considered phanerophytes; cacti and succulent plants were considered phanerophytes or chamaephytes, depending on the size of the adult plant; climbers were reclassified as phanerophytes, chamaephytes, or therophytes, depending on their ability to survive the dry season.