aestheticist

aestheticist

(iːsˈθɛtɪˌsɪst; ɪs-)
n
a person devoted to aesthetics and the pursuit of beauty
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
This is not to say that the many readers and critics who have taken Nabokov's antisocial aestheticist pronouncements at face value--classing him as one of the more extreme instances of the aloof and narcissistic modernist "master," a writer far more concerned with the perfection of his "private universe"(1) than with the needs of community--are simply mistaken.
The doctrines of the Pre-Raphaelite and aestheticist movements had unsettled previously held ideas about the purposes and function of art.
Meynell, Thain argues, joins with other aestheticist poets in presenting poetry as tactile and sculptural, in a way that attends to the modern problem of how an individual interacts with the world.
The salons held at the Robinson home, first on Gower Street and later on Earl's Terrace in Kensington, were attended by prominent poets and artists interested in the direction in which aestheticist thinking was taking all forms of art.
Baldwin, who opens "Poetic Morality" by castigating Cyril for being too much the aesthete, is an aesthete himself, readers soon discover, and it was he who originally convinced Cyril of the superiority of aestheticist precepts.
Chesterton here echoes a famous phrase of Walter Pater, the aestheticist critic who strongly influenced Wilde and other aesthetes.
Before, Ballester could have been accused of forcing the "real" photographic image to pretentious, aestheticist ends, but his recent works (despite having their origins in art rather than life) are more intense and stimulating: "Espacios ocultos" (Hidden Spaces), 2007-2008, is a series of images based on celebrated historical paintings but with the human figures and animals in the originals digitally removed.
Contributions by Margaret Stetz, Nattie Golubov, Nancy Paxton, and Schweizer contextualize West in a range of suggestive ways: Stetz discusses West's style in relation to the aestheticist legacy of the 1890s; Golubov likens her to Iris Murdoch as a novelist of ideas; Paxton's essay on the interchange of public and private concerns in The Judge discusses the novel in relation to the histories of both psychoanalysis and the women's suffrage movement; and Schweizer, in keeping with his earlier work, places West in a longer history-of-ideas context in his discussion of her philosophy of history.
For widely contrasting reasons, then, the commonsense historicist and the commonsense aestheticist collude in a desire to foreclose on further inquiry into the cultural work performed by the form of the editorial-response periodical, and by the rhetorical structures of address such periodicals aimed at the communities in which they circulated.
However, it is in his role as publisher and aestheticist that Barral was perhaps most important in bringing Spanish poetry out of its social-message-dominated backwater and back into the mainstream of European poetry, a confluence that had been broken by the Spanish Civil War.
The aestheticist ideal of art for art's sake rejects the concept of language as a vessel for useful knowledge, and accordingly, S.
Chandler, "Hallam, Tennyson, and the Poetry of Sensation: Aestheticist Allegories of a Counter-Public Sphere," SiR 33 (Winter 1994): 534.