aetiological

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aetiological

(ˌiːtɪəˈlɒdʒɪkəl) or

etiological

adj
1. of or relating to aetiology
2. (Philosophy) philosophy (of an explanation) in terms of causal precedents, as opposed, for instance, to the intentions of an agent
ˌaetioˈlogically, ˌetioˈlogically adv
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.aetiological - of or relating to the philosophical study of causation
2.aetiological - relating to the etiology of a diseaseaetiological - relating to the etiology of a disease; "etiological agent"
Translations

aetiological

, (US) etiological
adj (Med, fig) → ätiologisch
References in periodicals archive ?
It has been aetiologically associated with gastritis and gastric associated diseases, peptic ulcer, gastric adenocarcinoma and primary gastric carcinoma.
Patients satisfy core clinical criteria for possible AD (not probable AD) because of unclear clinical presentation--either an atypical clinical course or an aetiologically mixed presentation
Genetic link has been suggested to be aetiologically relevant in Fordyce's granules.
Corneal epithelial defects may be classified aetiologically into traumatic (including corneal abrasions), mechanical, infective, autoimmune and neurotrophic.
In malignant neoplasia of other squamous epithelia, viruses have been implicated and it is conceivable that viruses might contribute aetiologically in at least some cases of oral carcinoma.
Aetiologically, lumbar hernias can be divided into congenital, primary or acquired sets secondary to trauma or surgery.
One limitation of our study was that cross-sectional assessments and an aetiologically heterogeneous sample limit definitive conclusions.
6) By doing this I will examine the way in which Porphyrogenitus, with his wealth of knowledge of the classical tradition, reappropriates one of its greatest lessons on the power of concord between sons to aetiologically explain the nation's failure.
Body image dissatisfaction amongst males is said to aetiologically underpin the development of both anorexia nervosa (Waller et al.
Aetiologically, these stenoses were attributed to post-phlebitic changes in 6 patients, May-Thurner syndrome in 1 patient, and were idiopathic in 1 patient (Fig.
Parry's pathology, as written in the scientific appendix, is "an aetiologically heterogeneous disorder" (239).