afeared


Also found in: Thesaurus.

a·feard

also a·feared  (ə-fîrd′)
adj. Southern & Midland US
Afraid.

[Middle English afered, from Old English āfǣred, past participle of āfǣran, to frighten : ā-, intensive pref. + fǣran, to frighten (from fǣr, danger; see fear).]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.afeared - a pronunciation of afraidafeared - a pronunciation of afraid    
regionalism - a feature (as a pronunciation or expression or custom) that is characteristic of a particular region
afraid - filled with fear or apprehension; "afraid even to turn his head"; "suddenly looked afraid"; "afraid for his life"; "afraid of snakes"; "afraid to ask questions"

afeard

also afeared
adjective
Regional. Filled with fear or terror:
Regional: ascared.
References in classic literature ?
Indeed I am terribly afeared the squire will do her a mischief in his passion, for he is a prodigious passionate gentleman; and I am afeared too the poor lady will be brought to break her heart, for she is as tender-hearted as a chicken.
I'm afeared it's mighty dusty here today--but there's no need of looking at dust when you can look at such scenery, is there?"
Somehow it didn't seem to me that I said it was Mary before, so I didn't look up -- seemed to me I said it was Sarah; so I felt sort of cornered, and was afeared maybe I was looking it, too.
"Me and Huck's mighty glad to see you again, and you needn't be afeared we'll tell.
And now," he groaned, "she's afeared she will die without my being there to hold her hand."
I ain't afeared of anything on this side o' the grave; but I thought that maybe it was him that died o' the typhoid inspecting the drains what killed him.
Wolves is fine things in a storybook, and I dessay when they gets in packs and does be chivyin' somethin' that's more afeared than they is they can make a devil of a noise and chop it up, whatever it is.
'It's no reason, Arthur,' said the old woman, bending over him to whisper, 'that because I am afeared of my life of 'em, you should be.
'I've got a bad name this way,' said Fern; 'and I'm not likely, I'm afeared, to get a better.
class="MsoNormalThose who have been following the scriptures associated with the events or mysteries commemorated during that period will certainly have noted the recurrence in them of the command, "fear not" and its associated forms, like "do not be afraid" or, in classical English version, "be not afeared".
She questions whether Macbeth is "afeared / To be the same in thine own act and valour, / As thou art in desire" (1.7.39-41), accuses him of fearing to kill Duncan, and impugns his manhood.