affection

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af·fec·tion

 (ə-fĕk′shən)
n.
1. A tender feeling toward another; fondness.
2. often affections Feeling or emotion: an unbalanced state of affections.
3. A disposition to feel, do, or say; a propensity.
4. Obsolete Prejudice; partiality.

[Middle English affeccioun, from Old French affection, from Latin affectiō, affectiōn-, from affectus, past participle of afficere, to affect, influence; see affect1.]

af·fec′tion·al adj.
af·fec′tion·al·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

affection

(əˈfɛkʃən)
n
1. a feeling of fondness or tenderness for a person or thing; attachment
2. (often plural) emotion, feeling, or sentiment: to play on a person's affections.
3. (Pathology) pathol any disease or pathological condition
4. (Psychology) psychol any form of mental functioning that involves emotion. See also affect12
5. the act of affecting or the state of being affected
6. archaic inclination or disposition
[C13: from Latin affectiōn- disposition, from afficere to affect1]
afˈfectional adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

af•fec•tion

(əˈfɛk ʃən)

n.
1. fond attachment, devotion, or love.
2. Often, affections.
a. emotion; feeling: to let the affections sway our reason.
b. the emotional realm of love: to hold a place in one's affections.
3. a diseased condition: a gouty affection.
4. the act of affecting, or the state of being affected.
5. bent or disposition of mind.
[1200–50; Middle English < Old French < Latin affectiō]
af•fec′tion•less, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Affection

 

See Also: FRIENDSHIP, LOVE

  1. Affectionate as a miser toward his money —Anon
  2. (She had an) affection for her children almost like a cool governess —D. H. Lawrence
  3. Affection is the youth of the heart, and thought is the heart’s maturity —Kahlil Gibran

    Gibran completed the simile with “But oratory is its senility.”

  4. Affection, like melancholy, magnifies trifles —Leigh Hunt
  5. Affection, like spring flowers, breaks through the most frozen ground at last —Jeremy Bentham
  6. Affection, like the nut within the shell, wants freedom —Dion Boucicault
  7. Affection or love … intended for someone else and spilled accidentally like a bottle of ink under a dragging sleeve —Diane Wakoski
  8. Affections are like slippers; they will wear out —Edgar Saltus
  9. The affections, like conscience, are rather to be led than driven —Thomas Fuller
  10. Her cowlike, awkward affection surrounding him like a moist fog —Hank Searls
  11. The human affections, like the solar heat, lose their intensity as they depart from the center —Alexander Hamilton
  12. My affection has no bottom, like the Bay of Portugal —William Shakespeare

    The shorter, more commonly used “Affection is like a bottomless well” was more than likely inspired by this comparison from As You Like It

  13. She was like a cat in her fondness for nearness, for stroking, touching, nestling —Katherine Anne Porter
Similes Dictionary, 1st Edition. © 1988 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.affection - a positive feeling of likingaffection - a positive feeling of liking; "he had trouble expressing the affection he felt"; "the child won everyone's heart"; "the warmness of his welcome made us feel right at home"
feeling - the experiencing of affective and emotional states; "she had a feeling of euphoria"; "he had terrible feelings of guilt"; "I disliked him and the feeling was mutual"
attachment, fond regard - a feeling of affection for a person or an institution
protectiveness - a feeling of protective affection
regard, respect - a feeling of friendship and esteem; "she mistook his manly regard for love"; "he inspires respect"
soft spot - a sentimental affection; "she had a soft spot for her youngest son"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

affection

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

affection

noun
1. The condition of being closely tied to another by affection or faith:
2. A complex and usually strong subjective response, such as love or hate:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
عَطْف، حُنُو، حُب
náklonostsympatie
hengivenhedkærlighedømhed
vonzalom
hlÿhugur, ástúî
meiliaimeilusprielankumassimpatija
pieķeršanāssimpātijasafektsietekmeietekmēšana
naklonjenost

affection

[əˈfekʃən] Nafecto m (for, towards a hacia) → cariño m
to transfer one's affectionsdar su amor a otro/a
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

affection

[əˈfɛkʃən] naffection f
He has a special place in the affections of the public → Il est très aimé du public.
to feel affection for sb → avoir de l'affection pour qn
to win sb's affection → gagner l'affection de qn
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

affection

n
(= fondness)Zuneigung f no pl(for, towards zu); to win somebody’s affections (dated, hum)jds Zuneigung gewinnen; I have or feel a great affection for herich mag sie sehr gerne; don’t you even feel any affection for her at all?fühlst du denn gar nichts für sie?; you could show a little more affection toward(s) medu könntest mir gegenüber etwas mehr Gefühl zeigen; children who lacked affectionKinder, denen die Liebe fehlte; everybody needs a little affectionjeder braucht ein bisschen Liebe; he has a special place in her affectionser nimmt einen besonderen Platz in ihrem Herzen ein; display of affectionAusdruck mvon Zärtlichkeit
(Med) → Erkrankung f, → Affektion f (spec)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

affection

[əˈfɛkʃn] naffetto
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

affection

(əˈfekʃən) noun
liking or fondness. I have great affection for her, but she never shows any affection towards me.
afˈfectionate (-nət) adjective
having or showing affection. an affectionate child; She is very affectionate towards her mother.
afˈfectionately adverb
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

af·fec·tion

n. [sickness] afección, dolencia, enfermedad; [feeling] expresión de cariño, afecto o afección.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

affection

n cariño, afecto
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
His recollection of Harriet, and the words which clothed it, the "beautiful little friend," suggested to her the idea of Harriet's succeeding her in his affections. Was it impossible?No.Harriet undoubtedly was greatly his inferior in understanding; but he had been very much struck with the loveliness of her face and the warm simplicity of her manner; and all the probabilities of circumstance and connexion were in her favour.For Harriet, it would be advantageous and delightful indeed.
THERE be none of the affections, which have been noted to fascinate or bewitch, but love and envy.
They had overcome their natural sympathy with human frailties and affections. One, when he joined the Society, had brought with him his wife and children, but never, from that hour, had spoken a fond word to the former, or taken his best-loved child upon his knee.
Mrs Clay's affections had overpowered her interest, and she had sacrificed, for the young man's sake, the possibility of scheming longer for Sir Walter.
But we are often made to feel that our affections are but tents of a night.
He perceived that there was something else in the world besides the speculations of the Sorbonne, and the verses of Homer; that man needed affections; that life without tenderness and without love was only a set of dry, shrieking, and rending wheels.
The Mother fondles one and nurtures it with the greatest affection and care, but hates and neglects the other.
But some of us, regarding the ocean with understanding and affection, have seen it looking old, as if the immemorial ages had been stirred up from the undisturbed bottom of ooze.
Expressions which are in no way composite signify substance, quantity, quality, relation, place, time, position, state, action, or affection. To sketch my meaning roughly, examples of substance are 'man' or 'the horse', of quantity, such terms as 'two cubits long' or 'three cubits long', of quality, such attributes as 'white', 'grammatical'.
Bennet missed his second daughter exceedingly; his affection for her drew him oftener from home than any thing else could do.
They said he was Sensible, well-informed, and Agreable; we did not pretend to Judge of such trifles, but as we were convinced he had no soul, that he had never read the sorrows of Werter, and that his Hair bore not the least resemblance to auburn, we were certain that Janetta could feel no affection for him, or at least that she ought to feel none.
Vernon would allow something to my affection for herself and her husband in the length of my visit, she would do more justice to us all; but my sister is unhappily prejudiced beyond the hope of conviction against Lady Susan.