affective

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af·fec·tive

 (ə-fĕk′tĭv)
adj. Psychology
1. Influenced by or resulting from the emotions.
2. Concerned with or arousing feelings or emotions; emotional.

af·fec′tive·ly adv.
af′fec·tiv′i·ty (ăf′ĕk-tĭv′ĭ-tē) n.

affective

(əˈfɛktɪv)
adj
1. (Psychology) psychol relating to affects
2. concerned with or arousing the emotions or affection
affectivity, afˈfectiveness n

af•fec•tive

(ˈæf ɛk tɪv)

adj.
1. caused by or expressing emotion or feeling; emotional.
2. causing emotion or feeling.
[1540–50; < Medieval Latin]
af′fec•tive•ly, adv.
af•fec•tiv•i•ty (ˌæf ɛkˈtɪv ɪ ti) n.

affective

- Describing the emotional meaning of an utterance.
See also related terms for utterance.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.affective - characterized by emotionaffective - characterized by emotion    
emotional - of more than usual emotion; "his behavior was highly emotional"

affective

adjective
Relating to, arising from, or appealing to the emotions:
Translations
affektiv

affective

[əˈfektɪv] ADJafectivo

affective

adj (Psych) → affektiv

af·fec·tive

a. afectivo-a;
___ disorderstrastornos ___ -s;
___ symptomssíntomas ___ -s.
References in periodicals archive ?
Social, local and situated: recent findings about the affectiveness of older men's informal learning in community contexts.
Feghali (1997) reported that features of Arab communicative style include the following: (a) repetition (reiterations at the phonological, morphological, lexical, syntactic, and semantic levels), (b) elaboration (rich and expressive language use), and (c) affectiveness (affective style of emotional appeal).
The fundamental elements of this wellness model are based on the dimensions of spirituality, consciousness and self-regulation (including nutrition and physical exercise), of work and free time management, of social relations and friendship, and at last of the affectiveness.
However, against the prosodic movement of the poem the difficulties and failures of enunciation are highlighted--it is here that the affectiveness of the sequence can be located.
The narrator's migration has become a journey of mutual affectiveness, for he submits Paraguay to his scrutiny but gains a measure of belonging.
Two approaches for evaluating affectiveness are possible.
Readers are at the mercy not only of the imagery and emotional affectiveness of a passage, but also its formal aspects, its status as an unconnected and independent unit of text that proliferates dangerously in print culture.
As David Porter says of Emerson, "to his mind the thundering affectiveness of the poet was a manly virtue to be preferred to the character of Bryant's poems, Greenough's sculpture, and Dr.
If diagnostic ar therapeutic equipment is not in the right conditions for use, mistrust is created among patients damaging the health care company image and also reducing the affectiveness of treatments.
While similar, there may be biological differences that influence their affectiveness in California.
In this sense, Jolliffe and Farrington (2004), in their research on the influence of empathy in antisocial behaviour, found that cognitive empathy (ability to identify and understand the situation and/or emotional state of another person) and, to a lesser extent, affectiveness (ability to experience emotions which are similar or congruent with the emotional state observed in another person) present a pattern of negative relationship with detected or official delinquency.
Xiao, Noting and Anderson (1995) devised a 38-item scale to measure affectiveness, cognitive and behavioral attitudes towards credit cards.