affirmance


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affirmance

(əˈfɜːməns)
n
a verification, confirmation, or affirmation
References in classic literature ?
The restriction in question amounts to what lawyers call a NEGATIVE PREGNANT that is, a NEGATION of one thing, and an AFFIRMANCE of another; a negation of the authority of the States to impose taxes on imports and exports, and an affirmance of their authority to impose them on all other articles.
Tom, though against all form of law, rejoined in affirmance of the words.
But he is of your own faith, and his lightest affirmance would weigh down the most solemn protestations of the distressed Jewess.
The Stock Exchange contends that it requires affirmance.
Evaluating affirmance rates in the Supreme Court and circuit courts from earlier studies, Richard Pierce found that, as relevant here, the affirmance ranges for de novo, Skidmore, and Chevron review overlap: 66% for de novo review, 55.
As was noted in these pages a couple of years ago, (33) the defendant (who had benefitted from the appellate division ruling) urged that the issue had been preserved for appellate review, obviously assuming that such was necessary for affirmance.
Rather, our affirmance of the district court's disposition is simply a product of the discretion that Congress reposed in that court.
If the trial court allowed the testimony, the affirmance rate was 89%.
Amici curiae brief filed by American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Physicians for Reproductive Health, American Academy of Family Physicians, American Nurses Association, et al in support of the government and affirmance.
result below and, if the record supports the result, urge affirmance.
In particular, following the Fourth Circuit's affirmance of Governor McDonnell's corruption convictions, Jones Day successfully obtained a stay of that decision from the Supreme Court so that he could remain free on bail pending Supreme Court reviewthe first decision the Supreme Court has issued in several decades allowing a defendant to remain free on bail.
The court's affirmance of the university's admissions policy today does not necessarily mean the university may rely on that same policy without refinement," Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote in the majority (http://www.