affray


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af·fray

 (ə-frā′)
n.
A noisy quarrel or brawl.
tr.v. af·frayed, af·fray·ing, af·frays Archaic
To frighten.

[Middle English, from Old French effrei, esfrei, from esfraier, esfreer, to disturb; see prī- in Indo-European roots.]

affray

(əˈfreɪ)
n
(Law) law a fight, noisy quarrel, or disturbance between two or more persons in a public place
vb
(tr) archaic to frighten
[C14: via Old French from Vulgar Latin exfridāre (unattested) to break the peace; compare German Friede peace]

af•fray

(əˈfreɪ)

n.
1. a public fight; a noisy quarrel; brawl.
v.t.
2. Archaic. to frighten.
[1275–1325; Middle English < Anglo-French afrayer]

affray


Past participle: affrayed
Gerund: affraying

Imperative
affray
affray
Present
I affray
you affray
he/she/it affrays
we affray
you affray
they affray
Preterite
I affrayed
you affrayed
he/she/it affrayed
we affrayed
you affrayed
they affrayed
Present Continuous
I am affraying
you are affraying
he/she/it is affraying
we are affraying
you are affraying
they are affraying
Present Perfect
I have affrayed
you have affrayed
he/she/it has affrayed
we have affrayed
you have affrayed
they have affrayed
Past Continuous
I was affraying
you were affraying
he/she/it was affraying
we were affraying
you were affraying
they were affraying
Past Perfect
I had affrayed
you had affrayed
he/she/it had affrayed
we had affrayed
you had affrayed
they had affrayed
Future
I will affray
you will affray
he/she/it will affray
we will affray
you will affray
they will affray
Future Perfect
I will have affrayed
you will have affrayed
he/she/it will have affrayed
we will have affrayed
you will have affrayed
they will have affrayed
Future Continuous
I will be affraying
you will be affraying
he/she/it will be affraying
we will be affraying
you will be affraying
they will be affraying
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been affraying
you have been affraying
he/she/it has been affraying
we have been affraying
you have been affraying
they have been affraying
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been affraying
you will have been affraying
he/she/it will have been affraying
we will have been affraying
you will have been affraying
they will have been affraying
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been affraying
you had been affraying
he/she/it had been affraying
we had been affraying
you had been affraying
they had been affraying
Conditional
I would affray
you would affray
he/she/it would affray
we would affray
you would affray
they would affray
Past Conditional
I would have affrayed
you would have affrayed
he/she/it would have affrayed
we would have affrayed
you would have affrayed
they would have affrayed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.affray - noisy quarrelaffray - noisy quarrel        
dustup, quarrel, run-in, wrangle, row, words - an angry dispute; "they had a quarrel"; "they had words"
batrachomyomachia - a silly altercation
2.affray - a noisy fightaffray - a noisy fight        
fighting, combat, fight, scrap - the act of fighting; any contest or struggle; "a fight broke out at the hockey game"; "there was fighting in the streets"; "the unhappy couple got into a terrible scrap"

affray

noun fight, mêlée, contest, set-to (informal), encounter, outbreak of violence, scrap, disturbance, feud, quarrel, brawl, skirmish, scuffle, free-for-all (informal), fracas, dogfight, tumult, shindig (informal), scrimmage, shindy (informal), bagarre (French) He caused an affray at a pub.

affray

noun
A quarrel, fight, or disturbance marked by very noisy, disorderly, and often violent behavior:
Informal: fracas.
Slang: rumble.
Translations

affray

[əˈfreɪ] N (frm) → refriega f, reyerta f

affray

[əˈfreɪ] n (British) (LAW)échauffourée f, rixe f
He was charged with causing an affray → On l'a accusé d'avoir provoqué une rixe.

affray

n (esp Jur) → Schlägerei f

affray

[əˈfreɪ] n (Law) → rissa
References in classic literature ?
The Indian girl had been hurried off by her people at the outbreak of the affray.
We cannot but remark that both in this affair and that of Pierre's Hole the affray commenced by a hostile act on the part of white men at the moment when the Indian warrior was extending the hand of amity.
in an affray near Carthage, Leake county, Mississippi, between James Cottingham and John Wilburn, the latter was shot by the former, and so horribly wounded, that there was no hope of his recovery.
There were, moreover, Gothic letters, Hebrew letters, Greek letters, and Roman letters, pell-mell; the inscriptions overflowed at haphazard, on top of each other, the more recent effacing the more ancient, and all entangled with each other, like the branches in a thicket, like pikes in an affray.
I say this lest thou shouldst imagine that because we have been drubbed in this affray we have therefore suffered any indignity; for the arms those men carried, with which they pounded us, were nothing more than their stakes, and not one of them, so far as I remember, carried rapier, sword, or dagger.
Dantes was almost glad of this affray, and almost pleased at being wounded, for they were rude lessons which taught him with what eye he could view danger, and with what endurance he could bear suffering.
In the meantime, Crooks and M'Lellan had learnt the cause of the affray, and were each eager to take the quarrel into their own hands.
But Ivanhoe was like the war-horse of that sublime passage, glowing with impatience at his inactivity, and with his ardent desire to mingle in the affray of which these sounds were the introduction.
The mob hitherto had been passive spectators of the scene, but as the intelligence of the Pickwickians being informers was spread among them, they began to canvass with considerable vivacity the propriety of enforcing the heated pastry-vendor's proposition: and there is no saying what acts of personal aggression they might have committed, had not the affray been unexpectedly terminated by the interposition of a new-comer.
As he was reading, an affray arose between two gentlemen in the room, who were both partially intoxicated.
It was sometimes the case," continued Grandfather, "that affrays happened between such wild young men as these and small parties of the soldiers.
Such sordid things as stabbing affrays were evidently not fit subjects for conversation with a lady.