affright

(redirected from affrighting)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

af·fright

 (ə-frīt′)
tr.v. af·fright·ed, af·fright·ing, af·frights
To arouse fear in; terrify: "Many of nature's greatest oddities, that would affright dwellers up here, are accepted down there" (David Mazel).
n.
1. Great fear; terror.
2. A cause of terror.

[Middle English afrighten, from Old English āfyrhtan : ā-, intensive pref. + fyrhtan, to frighten (from fyrhto, fright).]

af·fright′ment n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

affright

(əˈfraɪt)
vb
(tr) to frighten
n
a sudden terror
[Old English āfyrhtan, from a-, a prefix indicating the beginning or end of an action + fyrhtan to fright]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

af•fright

(əˈfraɪt)

v.t.
1. to frighten.
n.
2. sudden fear or terror; fright.
[before 1000; Old English āfyrhtan=ā- a-3 + fyrhtan; see fright]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

affright


Past participle: affrighted
Gerund: affrighting

Imperative
affright
affright
Present
I affright
you affright
he/she/it affrights
we affright
you affright
they affright
Preterite
I affrighted
you affrighted
he/she/it affrighted
we affrighted
you affrighted
they affrighted
Present Continuous
I am affrighting
you are affrighting
he/she/it is affrighting
we are affrighting
you are affrighting
they are affrighting
Present Perfect
I have affrighted
you have affrighted
he/she/it has affrighted
we have affrighted
you have affrighted
they have affrighted
Past Continuous
I was affrighting
you were affrighting
he/she/it was affrighting
we were affrighting
you were affrighting
they were affrighting
Past Perfect
I had affrighted
you had affrighted
he/she/it had affrighted
we had affrighted
you had affrighted
they had affrighted
Future
I will affright
you will affright
he/she/it will affright
we will affright
you will affright
they will affright
Future Perfect
I will have affrighted
you will have affrighted
he/she/it will have affrighted
we will have affrighted
you will have affrighted
they will have affrighted
Future Continuous
I will be affrighting
you will be affrighting
he/she/it will be affrighting
we will be affrighting
you will be affrighting
they will be affrighting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been affrighting
you have been affrighting
he/she/it has been affrighting
we have been affrighting
you have been affrighting
they have been affrighting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been affrighting
you will have been affrighting
he/she/it will have been affrighting
we will have been affrighting
you will have been affrighting
they will have been affrighting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been affrighting
you had been affrighting
he/she/it had been affrighting
we had been affrighting
you had been affrighting
they had been affrighting
Conditional
I would affright
you would affright
he/she/it would affright
we would affright
you would affright
they would affright
Past Conditional
I would have affrighted
you would have affrighted
he/she/it would have affrighted
we would have affrighted
you would have affrighted
they would have affrighted
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.affright - an overwhelming feeling of fear and anxietyaffright - an overwhelming feeling of fear and anxiety
fear, fearfulness, fright - an emotion experienced in anticipation of some specific pain or danger (usually accompanied by a desire to flee or fight)
swivet - a panic or extreme discomposure; "it threw her into a swivet"
Verb1.affright - cause fear inaffright - cause fear in; "The stranger who hangs around the building frightens me"; "Ghosts could never affright her"
bluff - frighten someone by pretending to be stronger than one really is
stimulate, stir, shake up, excite, shake - stir the feelings, emotions, or peace of; "These stories shook the community"; "the civil war shook the country"
awe - inspire awe in; "The famous professor awed the undergraduates"
terrify, terrorise, terrorize - fill with terror; frighten greatly
intimidate - make timid or fearful; "Her boss intimidates her"
alarm, horrify, appal, appall, dismay - fill with apprehension or alarm; cause to be unpleasantly surprised; "I was horrified at the thought of being late for my interview"; "The news of the executions horrified us"
consternate - fill with anxiety, dread, dismay, or confusion; "After the terrorist attack, people look consternated"
spook - frighten or scare, and often provoke into a violent action; "The noise spooked the horse"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

affright

verb
To fill with fear:
Archaic: fright.
Idioms: make one's blood run cold, make one's hair stand on end, scare silly, scare the daylights out of.
noun
Great agitation and anxiety caused by the expectation or the realization of danger:
Slang: cold feet.
Idiom: fear and trembling.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

affright

(archaic) [əˈfraɪt] VT (poet) → asustar, espantar
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

affright

vt (old, liter)erschrecken
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
One imitative little imp covered his face with an old black handkerchief, thereby so affrighting his playmates that the panic seized himself, and he well-nigh lost his wits by his own waggery.
It was a place to quote Alastor in, and nothing but a bad memory prevented my affrighting the oaks and rills with declamation.
one could not help regretting that scenes so romantic and lovely should be impaired and destroyed by the black steam engines, by the yarn, the cloth, the cotton, the morals of the people destroyed by being crowded together and the hammers of the water engines perpetually affrighting quiet and comfort from vallies which at first view one would imagine were placed by nature in the most remote and sequestered situations for the peculiar residence of innocence and peace.