afoot


Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms.

a·foot

 (ə-fo͝ot′)
adv. & adj.
1. On foot; walking.
2. In the process of being carried out; astir: plans afoot to resign.

afoot

(əˈfʊt)
adj, adv (postpositive)
1. in circulation or operation; astir: mischief was afoot.
2. on or by foot

a•foot

(əˈfʊt)

adv., adj.
1. on foot; walking.
2. astir; in progress.
[1175–1225; Middle English a fote, on fote. See a-1, foot]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.afoot - traveling by footafoot - traveling by foot; "she was afoot when I saw her this morning"
moving - in motion; "a constantly moving crowd"; "the moving parts of the machine"
2.afoot - currently in progressafoot - currently in progress; "there is mischief afoot"; "plans are afoot"; "preparations for the trial are underway"
current - occurring in or belonging to the present time; "current events"; "the current topic"; "current negotiations"; "current psychoanalytic theories"; "the ship's current position"
Adv.1.afoot - on footafoot - on foot; walking; "they went to the village afoot"; "quail are hunted either afoot or on horseback"

afoot

adjective going on, happening, current, operating, abroad, brewing, hatching, circulating, up (informal), about, in preparation, in progress, afloat, in the wind, on the go (informal), astir We all knew that something awful was afoot.
Translations
جَارِ
v běhuv přípravě
í uppsiglingu, á seyîi
įgyvendinamasvykdomas
darbībā / apgrozībā esošsnotiekošs
v činnostiv prúde
hazırlık hâlinde

afoot

[əˈfʊt] ADV there is something afootalgo se está tramando
there is a plan afoot to remove himexiste un plan para apearlo
to set a scheme afootponer un proyecto en marcha, poner una idea en movimiento

afoot

[əˈfʊt] adv
there is something afoot → il se prépare quelque chose
moves are afoot to ... → des manœuvres ont été mises sur pieds pour ...

afoot

advim Gange; there is something afootda ist etwas im Gange; what’s afoot?was geht hier vor?

afoot

[əˈfʊt] adj & advin preparazione, in corso
there's trouble afoot → ci sono guai in vista
there is something afoot → si sta preparando qualcosa

afoot

(əˈfut) adverb
in progress or happening. There is a scheme afoot to improve recreational facilities in the area.
References in classic literature ?
Across a green open country came clean-limbed young men, some afoot, some mounted upon horses.
Pass into the other cave, you that need it, and seek for sleep; we must be afoot long before the sun, and make the most of our time to get to Edward, while the Mingoes are taking their morning nap.
He probably reached there about two or three o'clock in the morning, after having been afoot among the rocks and glaciers during two days and two nights.
You see, ef I kep' on tryin' to git away afoot, de dogs 'ud track me; ef I stole a skift to cross over, dey'd miss dat skift, you see, en dey'd know 'bout whah I'd lan' on de yuther side, en whah to pick up my track.
I went afoot the rest of the day, and let my wings hang.
Well, me and Tom allowed we would come along afoot and take a smell of the woods, and we run across Lem Beebe and Jim Lane, and they asked us to go with them blackberrying to-night, and said they could borrow Jubiter Dunlap's dog, because he had told them just that minute--"
The succeeding week seemed long: it came to an end at last, however, like all sublunary things, and once more, towards the close of a pleasant autumn day, I found myself afoot on the road to Lowton.
When he awoke and was afoot again, he lingered there yet a little longer, watching an eddy that turned and turned purposeless, until the stream absorbed it, and carried it on to the sea.
Fur, though she had run (as I have said) ever so fur in the night, she had oftentimes wandered long ways, partly afoot, partly in boats and carriages, and know'd all that country, 'long the coast, miles and miles.
I had always proposed to myself to get him well down the river in the boat; certainly well beyond Gravesend, which was a critical place for search or inquiry if suspicion were afoot.
Next morning I was afoot early, bent on my quest in right good earnest; for I had a remorseful feeling that I had not been sufficiently diligent the day before, had spent too much time in dreaming and moralising, in which opinion I am afraid the reader will agree.
I know you Christians,'' replied the Jew, ``and that the noblest of you will take the staff and sandal in superstitious penance, and walk afoot to visit the graves of dead men.