afterbody


Also found in: Encyclopedia.

afterbody

(ˈɑːftəˌbɒdɪ)
n, pl -bodies
(Astronautics) any discarded part that continues to trail a satellite, rocket, etc, in orbit
References in periodicals archive ?
Reynolds-Stress Modeling of Transonic Afterbody Flows," The Aeronautical Journal, June 2001, pp.
Their calculations showed that a flat-faced cylindrical shape with a flared afterbody was possible and if made of beryllium (the cylindrical part was assume to be the outer casing of the warhead) the resultant vehicle would be 134 pounds lighter than if composed of copper (Figure 6).
The experience indicated, when outside the boundary region is bigger than the model cross section characteristic size 20 times outside, may as far as possible avoid the separated vortex which afterbody curls up projecting on in the boundary, also reflects outside, simultaneously also causes the boundary condition which the boundary vicinity flow field parameter distribution well and that raises to be accommodating, the basic solution may achieve the very good astringency.
The deal will see SAIC producing afterbody / tailcone sections of the torpedoes for the US submarine fleet.
The exact timing of changes to the XBT system (analog-to-digital acquisition system, change of probe nose, thermistor, twin wire, plastic afterbody, wire coating, etc.
The Oyster 625 has about one metre more rig height than her predecessor, the 62, and clearly her lower slung and slightly heavier ballast keel was having good effect, combining with the increased form stability of her powerful afterbody to make the boat feel a lot bigger than the 62.
With a B-4 stand in hand, a co-worker and I walked to the aircraft and removed the top propeller afterbody.
The element to which I afterward learned to attach the greater importance was the incontrovertible fact that the lower and greater part of the void under the afterbody, constantly being made by the forward motion of the ship, is filled from underneath.
They boast a wood core, as well as the essential steel edges, and have a relatively stiff fore- and afterbody, giving optimum 'float' on the snow.
During the past few years, the K2 Alpine product development team has been experimenting with several trends in ski design, including the use of deeper sidecuts--a more severe hourglass ski shape (when viewed from above)--which enables a skier to carve turns more forcefully in hard snow; "fat" powder skis with wide fore and afterbody sections that enable the skis to "float" on soft snow; and shorter skis, which makes turning much easier.
This directive requires we check the afterbody bolts for proper thread count and nut plates for security.