against time


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
Related to against time: a race against time

time

 (tīm)
n.
1.
a. A nonspatial continuum in which events occur in apparently irreversible succession from the past through the present to the future.
b. An interval separating two points on this continuum; a duration: a long time since the last war; passed the time reading.
c. A number, as of years, days, or minutes, representing such an interval: ran the course in a time just under four minutes.
d. A similar number representing a specific point on this continuum, reckoned in hours and minutes: checked her watch and recorded the time, 6:17 am.
e. A system by which such intervals are measured or such numbers are reckoned: solar time.
2.
a. often times An interval, especially a span of years, marked by similar events, conditions, or phenomena; an era: hard times; a time of troubles.
b. times The present with respect to prevailing conditions and trends: You must change with the times.
3. A suitable or opportune moment or season: a time for taking stock of one's life.
4.
a. Periods or a period designated for a given activity: harvest time; time for bed.
b. Periods or a period necessary or available for a given activity: I have no time for golf.
c. A period at one's disposal: Do you have time for a chat?
5. An appointed or fated moment, especially of death or giving birth: He died before his time. Her time is near.
6.
a. One of several instances: knocked three times; addressed Congress for the last time before retirement.
b. times Used to indicate the number of instances by which something is multiplied or divided: This tree is three times taller than that one. My library is many times smaller than hers.
7.
a. One's lifetime.
b. One's period of greatest activity or engagement.
c. A person's experience during a specific period or on a certain occasion: had a good time at the party.
8.
a. A period of military service.
b. A period of apprenticeship.
c. Informal A prison sentence.
9.
a. The customary period of work: hired for full time.
b. The period spent working.
c. The hourly pay rate: earned double time on Sundays.
10. The period during which a radio or television program or commercial is broadcast: "There's television time to buy" (Brad Goldstein).
11. The rate of speed of a measured activity: marching in double time.
12. Music
a. The meter of a musical pattern: three-quarter time.
b. The rate of speed at which a piece of music is played; the tempo.
13. Chiefly British The hour at which a pub closes.
14. Sports A time-out.
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or measuring time.
2. Constructed so as to operate at a particular moment: a time release.
3. Payable on a future date or dates.
4. Of or relating to installment buying: time payments.
tr.v. timed, tim·ing, times
1. To set the time for (an event or occasion).
2. To adjust to keep accurate time.
3. To adjust so that a force is applied or an action occurs at the desired time: timed his swing so as to hit the ball squarely.
4. To record the speed or duration of: time a runner.
5. To set or maintain the tempo, speed, or duration of: time a manufacturing process.
6. To speculate based on the anticipated short-term performance of (a market): time the stock market.
Phrasal Verb:
time out
Computers To be canceled if an expected input is not received after a specified time. Used of processes.
Idioms:
against time
With a quickly approaching time limit: worked against time to deliver the manuscript before the deadline.
any time
Used to acknowledge an expression of gratitude.
at one time
1. Simultaneously.
2. At a period or moment in the past.
at the same time
However; nonetheless.
at times
On occasion; sometimes.
behind the times
Out-of-date; old-fashioned.
for the time being
Temporarily.
from time to time
Once in a while; at intervals.
high time
The appropriate or urgent time: It's high time that you started working.
in good time
1. In a reasonable length of time.
2. When or before due.
3. Quickly.
in no time
Almost instantly; immediately.
in time
1. Before a time limit expires.
2. Within an indefinite time; eventually: In time they came to accept the harsh facts.
3. Music
a. In the proper tempo.
b. Played with a meter.
on time
1. According to schedule; punctual or punctually.
2. By paying in installments.
time after time
Again and again; repeatedly.
time and again
Again and again; repeatedly.
time of (one's) life
A highly pleasurable experience: We had the time of our lives at the beach.
time on (one's) hands
An interval with nothing to do.
time was
There was once a time: "Time was when [urban gangs] were part of a ... subculture that inner-city adolescence outgrew" (George F. Will).

[Middle English, from Old English tīma; see dā- in Indo-European roots.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.against time - as fast as possibleagainst time - as fast as possible; before a deadline; "it was a race against the clock"
References in classic literature ?
Every passage of a ship of yesterday, whose yards were braced round eagerly the very moment the pilot, with his pockets full of letters, had got over the side, was like a race - a race against time, against an ideal standard of achievement outstripping the expectations of common men.
I traveled with awful velocity for my errand was a race against time with death.
Bed-time at last comes, to save you from doing something rash, and you spring upstairs, throw off your clothes, leaving them strewn all over the room, blow out the candle, and jump into bed as if you had backed yourself for a heavy wager to do the whole thing against time.
But, when I had paid for about a dozen chickens that he had killed; and had dragged him, growling and kicking, by the scruff of his neck, out of a hundred and fourteen street fights; and had had a dead cat brought round for my inspection by an irate female, who called me a murderer; and had been summoned by the man next door but one for having a ferocious dog at large, that had kept him pinned up in his own tool-shed, afraid to venture his nose outside the door for over two hours on a cold night; and had learned that the gardener, unknown to myself, had won thirty shillings by backing him to kill rats against time, then I began to think that maybe they'd let him remain on earth for a bit longer, after all.
It was better packed, and they were not carrying mail against time.
The three men surrounded Martin, all talking admiringly and at once, until it seemed to him that they were talking against time for a wager.
Now, besides very many babies just able to walk, there happened to be in Coketown a considerable population of babies who had been walking against time towards the infinite world, twenty, thirty, forty, fifty years and more.
This struck from all three allusions to Edgar Poe and Jules Verne, and such platitudes as naturally rise to the lips of the most intelligent when they are talking against time, and dealing with a new invention in which it would seem ingenuous to believe too soon; and the question of the telephone carried them safely back to the big house.
Characteristically, because he would uphold himself against mankind, his weather-glass against weather, and his clock against time.
Bredin himself, the owner of the Parisian Cafe; and it was this circumstance which first gave Paul the opportunity of declaring the passion which was gnawing him with the fierce fury of a Bredin customer gnawing a tough steak against time during the rush hour.
Indeed, it looked a little as though the round uncle were cutting magazine pages against time.
China Times: Earthquake rescuers racing against time as 'golden 72 hours' run out