agar


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a·gar

 (ā′gär′, ä′gär′) also a·gar-a·gar (ā′gär-ā′gär′, ä′gär-ä′-)
n.
1. A gelatinous material derived from certain marine algae. It is used as a base for bacterial culture media and as a stabilizer and thickener in many food products.
2. A culture medium containing this material.

[Short for Malay agar-agar.]

agar

(ˈeɪɡə)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a complex gelatinous carbohydrate obtained from seaweeds, esp those of the genus Gelidium, used as a culture medium for bacteria, a laxative, in food such as ice cream as a thickening agent (E406), etc. Also called: agar-agar
[C19: Malay]

a•gar

(ˈɑ gɑr, ˈæg ər)

n.
1. Also, a′gar-a′gar.a gel prepared from the cell walls of various red algae, used in laboratories as a culture medium, in food processing as a thickener and stabilizer, and in industry as a filler, adhesive, etc.
2. a culture medium having an agar base.
[1885–90; < Malay agaragar]

a·gar

(ā′gär′, ä′gär′)
A jelly-like material obtained from marine algae, especially seaweed. It is used as a medium for growing bacterial cultures in the laboratory and as a thickener and stabilizer in food products.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.agar - any culture medium that uses agar as the gelling agentagar - any culture medium that uses agar as the gelling agent
culture medium, medium - (bacteriology) a nutrient substance (solid or liquid) that is used to cultivate micro-organisms
agar-agar, agar - a colloidal extract of algae; used especially in culture media and as a gelling agent in foods
blood agar - a culture medium containing whole blood as the nutrient
2.agar - a colloidal extract of algaeagar - a colloidal extract of algae; used especially in culture media and as a gelling agent in foods
gum - any of various substances (soluble in water) that exude from certain plants; they are gelatinous when moist but harden on drying
agar, nutrient agar - any culture medium that uses agar as the gelling agent
Translations
agar

agar

[ˈeɪgəʳ] agar-agar [ˌeɪgərˈeɪgəʳ] nagar-agar m inv
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Chocolate milk agar was prepared using two formulations.
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Cut up 1 packet agar strips, soaked until soft but firm, squeeze out water.
The Maoao bay is blessed with rich marine life, and the locals have depended on the bay to harvest agar from nature and cultured the varicolored abalone (Haliotis diversicolor).
The SPLM-N is now divided into two factions: one led by Abdel Aziz al-Hilu and the other led by Malik Agar. The rift emerged last year over the right of self-determination and other organisational issues.
"MilkyWay" is the first instrument of its class and can be customised to perform more widespread applications that involve mixing liquid or liquefied samples with molten agar for traditional pour plate Total Viable Counts.
Among them Nutrient Glucose Agar (NGA) medium was significantly supported for the luxurious growth of the pathogen as evidenced by the maximum recovery of bacterial colonies (96.00) Nutrient agar medium was the next best which gave 85.40.
In global market, the demand for agar is dominated by food and beverage segment which especially includes bakery and dairy products.