macular degeneration

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macular degeneration

n.
A condition in which the cells of the macula lutea degenerate, causing blurred vision and ultimately blindness.

macular degeneration

n
(Pathology) pathological changes in the macula lutea, resulting in loss of central vision: a common cause of blindness in the elderly

mac′ular degenera′tion


n.
degeneration of the macula in the center of the retina, resulting in a loss of central vision but not affecting peripheral vision.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.macular degeneration - eye disease caused by degeneration of the cells of the macula lutea and results in blurred visionmacular degeneration - eye disease caused by degeneration of the cells of the macula lutea and results in blurred vision; can cause blindness
degeneration, devolution - the process of declining from a higher to a lower level of effective power or vitality or essential quality
eye disease - any disease of the eye
age-related macular degeneration, AMD - macular degeneration that is age-related
Translations

macular degeneration

n degeneración f macular
References in periodicals archive ?
Age-related maculopathy is the leading cause of vision loss among adults in developed countries, and its prevalence is expected to double over the next decade (Congdon et al.
Criteria for Study Inclusion: For the purposes of this systematic review, the term age-related maculopathy (ARM) was used as an overall term and AMD was used to describe late-stage disease.
The prevalence of age-related maculopathy in the Rotterdam Study.
Age-related maculopathy (or 'early AMD') is clinically characterised by yellowish-white deposits known as drusen, which may have indistinct or clear boundaries and which may be confluent or discrete (Figure 1).
The barrier to diffusion also occurs from the age of 45 onwards, but interestingly, the prevalence of visual loss from age-related maculopathy really only occurs in the eighth and ninth decades to a significant degree.
Investigations of colour discrimination in patients with age-related maculopathy (ARM) reveal a tritan defect, but the ability of clinical tests to detect this depends on the severity of ARM.
Apolipoprotein B in cholesterol-containing drusen and basal deposits of human eyes with age-related maculopathy.