agelast

agelast

(ˈædʒɪˌlæst)
n
formal a person who never laughs
References in periodicals archive ?
Ashington Motor Company Ltd sold a 35-yearold Jaguar XK Coupe to a buyer from Cumbria who had seen it advertised as being in fantastic condition, excellent condition and outstanding condition for the agelast October.
Who or what is an agelast? Someone who doesn't smile or laugh.
With these ingredients, the plot is laid out and we `know' that Pseudolus will help Calidorus to get the girl, to the discomfiture of father, pimp and soldier, and any other agelast characters who may come along.
The final defeat of Simo, I suggest, is an allusion to this type of scene.(72) So: in our imaginative reconstruction Plautus/Pseudolus alludes to two Greek play-scenes, a party at the end of the `Ballio's birthday' play on which the Pseudolus is most closely modelled, and a `persuasion of agelast character to join the party' scene to effect the final reconciliation.
On their part, and aside from their status and chosen profession, More and his fellow-conspirator Erasmus were first and foremost Christian humanists, who were adamant that the highest good was to be found in the cathedral of learning, provided it was not directed by a caucus of doctrinal theologians and scholastic philosophers--the quintessential agelasts of the day.
The agelasts (those who never laugh) often seem keen to use the wonders of social media to howl down anyone who dares to laugh at other cultures.
In this sense, Cohen can be understood as a fighter with the agelasts, i.e., pedantic individuals incapable of laughter, mirthless persons (Rabelais in Bakhtin).
To be sure, the agelasts that carnival mocks invariably pursue such a certainty, codifying a monologic perception that life experience can be reduced to a "finished" and "completed" order: they do so, however, doomed to live in "gloomy eschatological time."(10) Juxtaposed to such agelasts are the Halkits and Hardies through whom, in the opening chapter of The Heart of Mid-lothian, Scott offers a carnivalesque alternative, one that celebrates the virtues of synchronic time (comic time) with its emphasis upon "the world's revival and renewal."(11)
The other six are necessary to establish the continuity of Horatian influence: "Pope and Horace," by Robin Sowerby; "Good humour and the agelasts: Horace, Pope and Gray," by Felicity Rosslyn; "Horace and the nineteenth century," by Norman Vance; "Horace's Kipling," by Stephen Medcalf; "Some aspects of Horace in the twentieth century," by Charles Tomlinson; and "Deniable evidence: translating Horace," by C.