agemate

agemate

(ˈeɪdʒˌmeɪt)
n
a person roughly the same age as another person

age•mate

(ˈeɪdʒˌmeɪt)

n.
a person of about the same age as another.
[1575–85]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Married an agemate and I guess tried to forget his past.
An agemate of Miriam's could say, 'it looks like she doesn't respect her brother', 'it looks like' (ana ao doha) being a literal and significant component of the agemate's criticism.
Among the professors present, for example, I particularly noted my agemate (Bakoki) Chris Wanjala, who said movingly kind things about my literary critical writings, and my longtime KU colleagues, Ireri Mbaabu and Kitula King'ei.
But then, his new boss, a Chinese who is his agemate, started calling him a monkey.
'I took my son, who was then his agemate, to a school in western,' she said.
"With my meagre salary, I knew that there would always be a huge disparity between myself and my agemates.
We as in we "agemates" surely remember the American muscle cars of the '60s and '70s.
Peer-victimization has been defined as "the experience among children of being a target of the aggressive behaviour of other children, who are not siblings and not necessarily agemates" (Hawker & Boulton, 2000, p.
We defined the general anxiety level as well as various aspects of pupils' anxiety that occurs from contacts with agemates before the interrelationship with teachers.
Responses of abused and disadvantaged toddlers to distress in agemates: A study in the day care setting.
In the meantime, their husbands are at work or idle with their agemates. 'Family time'--if enjoyed--is generally spent together in the evenings, and again more often than not encompasses larger groups than nuclear families.
agemates to your tomb and speak long words of farewell.'" 26