agential

(redirected from agentially)

agential

Used to describe a case of nouns that identify the person peforming the action of a verb, for example, “singer.”
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.agential - of or relating to an agent or agency
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Rather than being mega-eureka moments, these small-scale critical moments serve to demonstrate the nature of a practicum pedagogy where students serve as apprentices to communities of practice with mentor figures, develop their habitus, and learn to work agentially, making sense of the real world, reflecting with initiative and hopefully taking action.
Norton effectively dismisses the agentially feminine element in the feminine-primitive by turning it into an abstraction and treating Neytiri as irrelevant except as "the feminine object of desire" in a male conflict.
Mindfulness practice has a deep affinity with the contemporary notion of self as "a reflexive project," something to be worked on agentially (Giddens, 1991: 75).
For Barad, ontology is a question of "the ontological inseparability of agentially intra-acting "components" (815).
This lapse may be read as the enactment of a desire to exist outside of the polarities of slavery and abolition and to occupy the interstices agentially. It is only in this undocumented rural space that Brown's body is ever free to exist in itself, to exist, that is, apart from the circulation of slave and ex-slave bodies endemic to the slave economy and to the abolition movement, respectively.
Where regular drug use is designated by a term that implies the inability to agentially generate or enact speech, where, indeed, the drug user is designated by the ontological state of being defined rather than by the ontological act of defining (that is, of passivity rather than activity) there is little room for surprise that drug users are commonly presented as other than, or less than, fully fledged liberal subjects (that is, full citizens).
Foucauldian studies of organization have been criticised for downplaying the significance of human agency and failing to address the way people 'agentially play with discursive practices' (Newton 1998: 430) in their constitution as subjects of power/knowledge relations (Newton 1998; Halford and Leonard 1999; Reed 2000).
It also provides an empirical example in which individuals subject to certain organizational and societal discourses agentially play with the associated discursive practices and forms, sometimes in collaboration, sometimes in conflict and often in compromise (cf.
On the other hand, unless we understand how people agentially play with discursive practices, we can never comprehend the social processes which determine the form of their constitution as subjects of power/knowledge relations.