ages


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ages

epochs, eras, periods: Human nature has not changed a great deal throughout the ages.
Not to be confused with:
aegis – protection; support; sponsorship; auspices: The fundraising event was under the aegis of the Literary Arts Society.

age

 (āj)
n.
1.
a. The length of time that a person or thing has existed: a man 23 years of age; wanted to know the age of the house.
b. The time of life when a person becomes qualified to assume certain civil and personal rights and responsibilities, usually at 18 or 21 years; legal age: under age; of age.
c. One of the stages of life: the age of adolescence; at an awkward age.
d. The state of being old; old age: hair white with age.
2. often Age
a. A period of time marked by a distinctive characteristic, achievement, or figure: the Stone Age; the computer age; the Elizabethan Age.
b. A period in the history of the earth, usually shorter than an epoch: the Ice Age.
3.
a. The period of history during which a person lives: a product of his age.
b. A generation: ages yet unborn.
4. ages Informal An extended period of time: left ages ago.
v. aged, ag·ing, ag·es
v.tr.
1. To cause to become old or to show the signs of becoming old: The stress of the office visibly aged the president.
2. To cause to mature or ripen under controlled conditions: aging wine.
3. To change (the characteristics of a device) through use, especially to stabilize (an electronic device).
v.intr.
1. To become old or show signs of becoming old: Who doesn't want to age gracefully?
2. To develop a certain quality of ripeness; become mature: cheese aging at room temperature.
Phrasal Verb:
age out Informal
To reach an age, 18 or 21 years, for example, at which one is no longer eligible for certain special services, such as education or protection, from the state.
Idiom:
come of age
To reach maturity.

[Middle English, from Old French aage, from Vulgar Latin *aetāticum, from Latin aetās, aetāt-, age; see aiw- in Indo-European roots.]

ag′er n.
References in classic literature ?
For there is a youth in thoughts, as well as in ages. And yet the invention of young men, is more lively than that of old; and imaginations stream into their minds better, and, as it were, more divinely.
At whatever period of life disuse or selection reduces an organ, and this will generally be when the being has come to maturity and to its full powers of action, the principle of inheritance at corresponding ages will reproduce the organ in its reduced state at the same age, and consequently will seldom affect or reduce it in the embryo.
Happy people, who enjoy so many living examples of ancient virtue, and have masters ready to instruct them in the wisdom of all former ages! but happiest, beyond all comparison, are those excellent STRULDBRUGS, who, being born exempt from that universal calamity of human nature, have their minds free and disengaged, without the weight and depression of spirits caused by the continual apprehensions of death!" I discovered my admiration that I had not observed any of these illustrious persons at court; the black spot on the forehead being so remarkable a distinction, that I could not have easily overlooked it: and it was impossible that his majesty, a most judicious prince, should not provide himself with a good number of such wise and able counsellors.
These Greek capitals, black with age, and quite deeply graven in the stone, with I know not what signs peculiar to Gothic caligraphy imprinted upon their forms and upon their attitudes, as though with the purpose of revealing that it had been a hand of the Middle Ages which had inscribed them there, and especially the fatal and melancholy meaning contained in them, struck the author deeply.
'Even the wise and mysterious therns of Barsoom, that ancient cult which for countless ages has been credited with holding the secret of life and death in their impregnable fastnesses upon the hither slopes of the Mountains of Otz, are as ignorant as we.
Upon closer observation I saw as we passed them that the buildings were deserted, and while not greatly decayed had the appearance of not having been tenanted for years, possibly for ages. Toward the center of the city was a large plaza, and upon this and in the buildings immediately surrounding it were camped some nine or ten hundred creatures of the same breed as my captors, for such I now considered them despite the suave manner in which I had been trapped.
THE END OF THE MIDDLE AGES. ABOUT 1350 TO ABOUT 1500
As the air I breathe is drawn from the great repositories of nature, as the light on my book is yielded by a star a hundred millions of miles distant, as the poise of my body depends on the equilibrium of centrifugal and centripetal forces, so the hours should be instructed by the ages and the ages explained by the hours.
The story of my life, in the interval between these two ages, is a story that can be soon told.
But at my age I can hardly get to the city, and therefore you should come oftener to the Piraeus.
Now whoever will examine into the nature of animals, and also observe those people who are very desirous their children should acquire a warlike habit, will find that they feed them chiefly with milk, as being best accommodated to their bodies, but without wine, to prevent any distempers: those motions also which are natural to their age are very serviceable; and to prevent any of their limbs from being crooked, on account of their extreme ductility, some people even now use particular machines that their bodies may not be distorted.
He came of rich people down in Somersetshire, who had nursed this combination of qualities until they made the discovery that it was just of age and a blockhead.