aggadic


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Related to aggadic: Aggadot, Aggadic midrashim

aggadic

(əˈɡædɪk)
adj
(Judaism) relating to an Aggadah
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Ted Solotaroff, "the narrative itself is steeped in the aggadic tradition; taking the Book of Ruth and some of its texture from the Song of Songs, Ms.
Yet when we consider the many comments about Jonah found in aggadic sources, another picture emerges.
As some of his own examples show, aggadic insights regarding the God of Israel have often proven, in the history of Judaism and Chri stianity, to prompt surprising changes in conduct.
2) What is clear, however, is that while from either of the above perspectives it would have been valid Mishnaic and Talmudic editorial form to quote an halakhic opinion or an aggadic statement either accompanied or unaccompanied in the first instance by its biblical support-text, yet it would be singularly inappropriate and mystifying to do the reverse: simply to quote a verse from the Bible and leave it to subsequent generations of Mishnah and Talmud students to guess at the elucidatory teaching that the sage whose name accompanies that particular biblical quotation must originally have offered.
Rather, the passage to histo rical past began on the similar territory of aggadic matter, the historical tales in the Talmud and associated religious literature.
Sasportas (1610-1698), head of the yeshiva Etz Hayyim and rabbi of the Portuguese community, wrote Toledot Ya'acov, an index of the Aggadic material in the Jerusalem Talmud, responsa Ohel Ya-acov, edited and published by his son Abraham Sasportas.
And to do so we must turn to the halakhic sources that define the rabbinic sukkah rather than aggadic traditions about its symbolism.
In this work, as in his two other major books (one written while still in Winnipeg, the other after he had moved back to Israel), Horowitz drew from an impressive array of halakhic, aggadic, mystical and Hasidic sources.
Mar" on aggadic matters that are completely unrelated to the previous issue but their inclusion creates a tripartite structure consisting of statements brought in the name of "R.
This is a presumption that transgender and intersex scholars of Aggadic literature have refuted, some even suggesting that Adam was originally "one creature both male and female" before the Eve feminine is divorced from Adam's body.
Comparative Midrash: The Plan and Program of Genesus Rabba and Levitivcus Rabbah (1986) is illustrative of his take on the uses and abuse of aggadic midrash, that is, nonlegal ethical and hermeneutical pronouncements peppered with philosophical wisdom and a vast amount of folk tradition tied to a historical context, though aspects of it are legal and very close to the halakhic strands of the Talmud.
The messages of these aggadic comments are that the Jews deserved to be punished for not caring about the Temple during the time of Achashverosh, and that while Achashverosh had a positive relationship with Esther, he still would not go so far as to allow the Temple to be rebuilt.