aggressivity


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aggressivity

(ˌæɡrɛˈsɪvɪtɪ)
n
(Psychoanalysis) the state or quality of being aggressive
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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aggressiveness

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

aggressivity

n (= belligerence)Aggressivität f, → Angriffslust f; (= forcefulness)Dynamik f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
The women writers of the querelle suffered much criticism and ridicule for what was perceived as the inappropriate aggressivity of their arguments, despite the popularity of the invective form among their male counterparts.
Notable advantages of this test are its lower aggressivity than the salt fog test and the inclusion of exposure to UV radiation.
The comorbid disorder that is most often implicated as a confound to the link between ADHD and alcohol is conduct disorder (CD), or more broadly, the antisocial spectrum of behavior that includes aggressivity and oppositional defiant disorder in childhood, CD in adolescence, and antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) in adulthood.
YAB: I think generally speaking there is a clear aggressivity on the part of Picasso - not necessarily toward the woman's body but toward us, the beholder.
Persuasively arguing for a dogged literalism when interpreting this body, Paster is able to avoid a simple treatment of the imaginary physiological body as social allegory, and instead begins to develop--quite eloquently, I think--a poetics of force in which the figuration of a physiological, explosive spirit is an historically specific crystallization of the civilizing process's aggressivity. This crystallization, Paster suggests, tends to rationalize contrasting ethical tropes "like impulsiveness versus self-containment, spontaneity versus calculation or strategic thinking" (121) that one might find emplotted in Shakespeare's plays.
Some of the major issues today include the aggressivity of light trucks and sport utility vehicles (SUVs), which are four times more likely to kill the occupants of passenger cars in crashes.
Thus, Bound refuses lesbian-feminist misreadings of butch-femme cultures which equated femme with passivity, and butch with sexual aggressivity. Moreover, it is Violet who must play a far more active and direct role in the various plots, while Corky spends much of the time either waiting in the apartment next door, or bound in Violet's closet.
Lionel's or the narrator's image of her as the spider both controlling and condemning her children for sin connects to Freud's discussion in "Femininity" of the aggressivity of the female spider, an image used to deconstruct the binarism of female passivity and male aggressivity and to suggest an alternate figure of the phallic mother (Standard Edition 22:115).
It is more than politeness, it is a way of thinking which is foreign to any type of polemic and aggressivity. .
However, it does not help us determine whether the fault lies in parental aggressivity or lack of communication (or both).
Aggressivity toward the image was most forcefully registered in perhaps the strongest work in the show, Liisa Roberts' film projection, 3 Minutes of Desire, 1993.
He said applied psychologists in Denmark, Germany, Great Britain, the Netherlands, and Switzerland estimate that 30 percent to 80 percent of all traffic accidents are due to driver aggressivity. In Turkey, James said there is a traffic sign posted along many highways that says, translated: "Control your driving dragon inside you."