Agnes


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Related to Agnes: Saint Agnes

Ag·nes

 (ăg′nĭs), Saint Died c. ad 304.
Roman Christian who, according to tradition, was martyred as a virgin at the age of 13. She is the patron saint of young girls.

Agnes

(ˈæɡnɪs)
n
(Biography) Saint. ?292–?304 ad, Christian child martyr under Diocletian. Feast day: Jan 21

Ag•nes

(ˈæg nɪs)

n.
Saint, A.D. 292?–304?, Christian martyr.
Translations
Anežka
Agnes
Aune
Ágnes
Agnes
Agnieszka
Inês
Agnes

Agnes

[ˈægnɪs] NInés
References in classic literature ?
On the day of the marriage Agnes Lockwood sat alone in the little drawing-room of her London lodgings, burning the letters which had been written to her by Montbarry in the bygone time.
Agnes took a chair by his side, and looked at him with a gentle surprise.
Try to forget them both, Agnes. I wish to God I could help you to do it!'
They were Agnes la Herme, Jehanne de la Tarme, Henriette la Gaultière, Gauchère la Violette, all four widows, all four dames of the Chapel Etienne Haudry, who had quitted their house with the permission of their mistress, and in conformity with the statutes of Pierre d'Ailly, in order to come and hear the sermon.
"What is this, sister?" said Agnes to Gauchère, gazing at the little creature exposed, which was screaming and writhing on the wooden bed, terrified by so many glances.
"I'm not learned in the matter of children," resumed Agnes, "but it must be a sin to look at this one."
I went to Canterbury first, that I might take leave of Agnes and Mr.
Everyone who knows you, consults with you, and is guided by you, Agnes.'
'You talk,' said Agnes, breaking into a pleasant laugh, as she sat at work, 'as if I were the late Miss Larkins.'
'Well, Agnes, you must not take such long walks again before breakfast,' said my mother, observing that I drank an extra cup of coffee and ate nothing--pleading the heat of the weather, and the fatigue of my long walk as an excuse.
But why did you sit back there, Agnes,' she added, 'and talk so little?'
He even called me 'Agnes:' the name had been timidly spoken at first, but, finding it gave no offence in any quarter, he seemed greatly to prefer that appellation to 'Miss Grey;' and so did I.