agnosticism


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ag·nos·ti·cism

 (ăg-nŏs′tĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1. The doctrine that certainty about first principles or absolute truth is unattainable and that only perceptual phenomena are objects of exact knowledge.
2. The belief that the existence or nonexistence of a deity or deities cannot be known with certainty.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ag•nos•ti•cism

(ægˈnɒs təˌsɪz əm)

n.
the doctrine or belief of an agnostic.
[1870–75]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

agnosticism

the tenet that neither the existence nor the nature of God is known or knowable. — agnostic, n., adj.
See also: God and Gods
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.agnosticism - a religious orientation of doubt; a denial of ultimate knowledge of the existence of God; "agnosticism holds that you can neither prove nor disprove God's existence"
religious orientation - an attitude toward religion or religious practices
2.agnosticism - the disbelief in any claims of ultimate knowledgeagnosticism - the disbelief in any claims of ultimate knowledge
unbelief, disbelief - a rejection of belief
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
agnosticismus
agnostismi
agnosticizam
不可知論
agnostisisme
agnosticism
agnosticism
不可知論

agnosticism

[ægˈnɒstɪsɪzəm] Nagnosticismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

agnosticism

[ægˈnɒstɪsɪzəm] nagnosticisme m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

agnosticism

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

agnosticism

[ægˈnɒstɪsɪzm] nagnosticismo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Come along, or it will be dark before we get to Stourcastle, and there's no place we can sleep at nearer than that; besides, we must get through another chapter of A COUNTERBLAST TO AGNOSTICISM before we turn in, now I have taken the trouble to bring the book."
Morse bitterly arraigned the English philosopher's agnosticism, but confessed that he had not read "First Principles"; while Mr.
Zarathustra now meets the last pope, and, in a poetical form, we get Nietzsche's description of the course Judaism and Christianity pursued before they reached their final break-up in Atheism, Agnosticism, and the like.
The priest shook his head, whether in dissent or agnosticism, but remained mute.
The topics are a historical overview; model skepticism and modal expressivism; modalism; modal realism; ersatzism; model fictionalism and modal agnosticism; the new modal actualism; necessities, necessary existents, and their bounds.
The best that skepticism can be is "a generalized agnosticism," which Oakeshott embraces and which allows the subjects it has explicitly rejected "to reenter through the back door." Botwinick says that Oakeshott's generalized agnosticism does not, say, reject God, but just makes the knowledge of much about Him uncertain.
During my teenage years, I began to question God's existence and the validity of religion (agnosticism).
Agnosticism doesn't say there is no God; it says that God's existence or nonexistence can't be proven.
The second is, paradoxically, that this so-called tolerance, in its rejection of religion's claim to possess the truth about God and man, can itself be intolerant and even bigoted, for agnosticism is a complete and comprehensive worldview, as narrow and specific in its tenets as the fiercest Muslim fundamentalism.
In addition, agnosticism by this time had become a socially acceptable intellectual position, especially within the elite circles exemplified by Clarke and James.
Agnosticism is not properly described as a negative creed, nor indeed as a creed of any kind, except insofar as it expressed absolute faith in the validity of a principle, which is as much ethical as intellectual.
Holding that the analogia entis terminates in ambiguity and agnosticism since it keeps God too distant from rather than too close to humanity, Jungel proposes a clear and unambiguous analogia fidei, a discourse about God based on Jesus the Word's direct address to us, especially on the cross.