agogics

agogics

the theory that accent within a musical phrase can also be expressed by modifying the duration of certain notes rather than only by modifying dynamic stress. — agogic, adj.
See also: Music
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References in periodicals archive ?
Then collectively off-headphones, I help them make decisions about shaping, dynamics and agogics based exclusively on the form of the piece and its musical events--melodic, rhythmic, harmonic, textural.
The score cues and tells many a thing--particularly the dynamics, tempo and agogics markings.
Also, agogics and dynamics play an important part in creating the desired effects.
48) Vettik to Laasmae about the articulation, dynamics and agogics of the repertoire taught to male choirs.
Wilson, in "Nineteenth-Century Musical Agogics as an Element in Gerard Manley Hopkins's Prosody" (CL 52, no.
The author sketches several illustrative spaces; some are familiar, while others are original and suggestive (such as a model of musical agogics in which chronometric time is expressed as a function of varying tempo and meter).
That which is lacking in Hough and Nelsons's creation--free agogics, sharper accentuation and rhythmic pulsation--is there in spades in Christian Tetzlaff and John Storgards's account of Suk's Fantasy, and Dvorak's Violin Concerto and Romance.
Ax encapsulates the unique pianistic qualities of Horowitz as 1) an enormous dynamic range, coupled with complete control of the subtle shadings; 2) an "extraordinary sensibility for the agogics of melodic line;"
One simply cannot get enough of the account of Suk's piece, so balanced is it in terms of dynamics, agogics and tempo (Jansons's ability to opt for the most natural paces is truly admirable), perhaps also because it was recorded in a studio, not live, as is the case of Dvorak's Eighth and Carnival.
Surprisingly, Serebrier was economical with the agogics in the finale, yet the magical nocturnal atmosphere of the second movement, the evolutional tempos and the accentuated viola passages make the recording impressive enough.
Cantus has a splendidly homogenous sound, evincing itself from the very first chords of the opening track, Janacek's Veni, Sancte Spiritus--perfectly tonally balanced, rich and beautifully soft, with the singers resourcefully working with the agogics and the dynamic structure of the musical phrases (enthralling decrescendos).
By and large, the performance of the slow movements is a forte of the album, even though they are very objective in terms of agogics.