agony column

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Related to agony columns: Agony uncle

agony column

n.
A newspaper column containing advertisements chiefly about missing relatives or friends.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

agony column

n
1. (Journalism & Publishing) a magazine or newspaper feature in which advice is offered to readers who have sent in letters about their personal problems
2. (Journalism & Publishing) a part of a newspaper containing advertisements for lost relatives, personal messages, etc
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.agony column - a newspaper column devoted to personal problemsagony column - a newspaper column devoted to personal problems
editorial, newspaper column, column - an article giving opinions or perspectives
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

agony column

nposta del cuore
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
"Because there are many ciphers which I would read as easily as I do the apocrypha of the agony column: such crude devices amuse the intelligence without fatiguing it.
I tossed the paper down upon the table, but at that moment my eye caught an advertisement in the agony column. It ran in this way:
When you have agreed to our terms, insert a suitable notice in the agony column of the "Morning Blazer." We shall then acquaint you with our plan for transferring the sum mentioned.
Sherlock Holmes was, as I expected, lounging about his sitting-room in his dressing-gown, reading the agony column of The Times and smoking his before-breakfast pipe, which was composed of all the plugs and dottles left from his smokes of the day before, all carefully dried and collected on the corner of the mantelpiece.
If a problematic relationship caused a woman's agony, the man in that relationship can be expected to have a problem as well, simply because a relationship involves these two participants, and both individuals could/should be advised to work together by not only an "Agony Aunt" but also by an "Agony Uncle." Toward the end of this paper, I outline examples that reveal how men might participate within the practice of "agony-resolution" so that there are ways in which new subjects of discourse (of Agony Columns) could be constituted.
You can read about them every day in the agony columns of the women's glossies.
They add agony columns to business sections so that banking experts can assuage the fears of ordinary readers who ask down-homey questions like, "Will the euro make prices rise?" And they give the best play to articles with feel-good headlines, such as "The euro: panacea for the euro-jobless," and "The euro breaks the dollar's world hegemony." In these articles, nobody loses a job; businesses just become "more competitive."
There are a lot of magazine agony columns out there but the most unusual has to be Ask Dr Ozzy in a Sunday paper.
Reared on agony columns that went no further than a kiss, Family Circle woman thought she preferred a more wholesome approach - 'shoes to make you go ooh!' - to her adult world until a raft of new magazines came along to woo her with glamour, sex and shopping.
(But contrary to 1000 agony columns, it's a lousy way to find romance unless you have a serious thing about oil stains and spanners).
Television's new agony aunt Trisha Goddard can offer first-hand advice on these harrowing subjects and more - because this is the story of her life and it could fill a dozen agony columns.