agrammatical

Related to agrammatical: ungrammatical

agrammatical

(ˌeɪɡrəˈmætɪkəl)
adj
(Linguistics) linguistics not obeying the rules of grammar
Translations

agrammatical

[ˌeɪgrəˈmætɪkəl] ADJagramatical
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References in periodicals archive ?
Like his 'I would prefer not to,' he is said to be an 'agrammatical' person--an an exception without referent in the existing social world (Deleuze, 1997, p.
Anyone who has had the misfortune of reading a printed copy of an electronic health record knows that it is often an agrammatical, incomprehensible mess.
Yet at times his speech would also be agrammatical. His language comprehension and ability to repeat phrases were intact.
Linguistic disorders of posterior system strokes LOCALIZATION LINGUISTIC DISORDER CEREBELLUM Dysarthria, anarthria Verbal fluency deficits Reading deficiencies Agrammatical speech Cerebellar lesion induced aphasia THALAMUS Reduction of speech output Anomia Paraphasia OCCIPITAL LOBE Pure alexia
For Deleuze and Guattari, great style is a non-style; it becomes asyntactic, strained, and agrammatical. Great literature and language is no longer defined by what it says or signifies, but by what it causes to move, flow, and explode--the kind of a-signifying style of which Guattari affirms.
Without abandoning these grammars, the agrammatical formula holds them in suspension.
(16.) Deleuze explores the notion of literature as that which pushes language toward its "asyntactic" and "agrammatical" limits and identifies three ways in which Artaud's writing achieves this: "La chute des lettres dans la decomposition du langage maternel (R, T ...); leur reprise dans une nouvelle syntaxe ou de nouveaux noms a portee syntaxique, createurs d'une langue ("eTReTe"); les mots-souffles enfin, limite asyntaxique ou tend tout le langage" (16).
That's what style is or rather the absence of style--asyntactic, agrammatical: the moment when language is no longer defined by what it says, even less by what makes it a signifying thing, but by what causes it to move, to flow, and to explode--desire.
Eventually they would define what they had meant by radical as writing that used modernist techniques of fragmentation, quotation, disruption, disjunction, agrammatical syntax, and so on.
If we are to take Sean McCann's impressive book A Pinnacle of Feeling as a guide, Barack Obama would seem the acme of what Americans want and expect from the presidency: the perfect blend of coercion, sympathy, and a rhetorical prowess that--though often remarked on in implicitly racist terms--is nevertheless impressive both in its own right and by contrast with the agrammatical stammerings of George W.
Je commencerai par le titre "Quelque chose noir", qui, comme j'ai deja eu l'occasion de le dire, est pratiquement agrammatical en francais, oo il aurait fallu dire "quelque chose de noir" ou "quelque chose noire" au feminin.
Cameron, indeed, argues that Melville's acategorial thinking is manufactured by his agrammaticality: "there is something apparently agrammatical about a suffusion of like features across ostensibly discrete realms" (I 191).