agriculture

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ag·ri·cul·ture

 (ăg′rĭ-kŭl′chər)
n.
The science, art, and business of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock; farming.

[Middle English, from Latin agrīcultūra : agrī, genitive of ager, field; see agro- in Indo-European roots + cultūra, cultivation; see culture.]

ag′ri·cul′tur·al adj.
ag′ri·cul′tur·al·ly adv.
ag′ri·cul′tur·ist, ag′ri·cul′tur·al·ist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

agriculture

(ˈæɡrɪˌkʌltʃə)
n
(Agriculture) the science or occupation of cultivating land and rearing crops and livestock; farming; husbandry.
[C17: from Latin agricultūra, from ager field, land + cultūra culture]
ˌagriˈcultural adj
ˌagriˈculturally adv
ˌagriˈculturist, ˌagriˈculturalist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ag•ri•cul•ture

(ˈæg rɪˌkʌl tʃər)

n.
the science, art, or occupation concerned with cultivating land, raising crops, and feeding, breeding, and raising livestock; farming.
[1425–75; late Middle English < Middle French < Latin agrīcultūra=agrī, genitive singular of ager field + cultūra culture]
ag`ri•cul′tur•al, adj.
ag`ri•cul′tur•al•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Agriculture

See also plants; soil.

the art and science of farming. Also called tillage. — agriculturist, agriculturalist, n. — agricultural, adj.
the branch of geology concerned with the adaptability of land to agriculture, soil quality, etc. — agrogeologist, n.
agronomy.
the science of management in farming. Also spelled agronomics. — agronomist, n.
Rare. useful arts, as agriculture, commerce, and manufacturing.
the cultivation of citrus fruits, as lemons, oranges, etc. — citriculturist, n.
a cultivator or a person who grows things.
Law. the growing of crops and the profits reaped therefrom.
Rare. a proponent of the practice of leaving fields fallow.
the principles and adherence to the principles of the Grange. — granger, n.
the practice and science of cultivating gardens, for the growth of flowers, fruits, or vegetables. — horticulturist, n. — horticultural, adj.
1. Obsolete, domestic management, thrift, or frugality.
2. farming, especially the care of farm animals.
the use of land for the cultivation of only one type of crop. — monocultural, adj.
a person who tends or cultivates an orchard.
the herding or tending of cattle as a primary economic activity or occupation. Also called pasturage. — pastoralist, n.pastoral, adj.
pastoralism.
the cultivation of fruit and fruit-trees.
agriculture.
the seasonal migration of livestock and those who tend livestock between mountain and valley, as practiced in Switzerland. — transhumant, adj.
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.agriculture - a large-scale farming enterpriseagriculture - a large-scale farming enterprise  
business enterprise, commercial enterprise, business - the activity of providing goods and services involving financial and commercial and industrial aspects; "computers are now widely used in business"
2.agriculture - the practice of cultivating the land or raising stockagriculture - the practice of cultivating the land or raising stock
cultivation - (agriculture) production of food by preparing the land to grow crops (especially on a large scale)
animal husbandry - breeding and caring for farm animals
arboriculture, tree farming - the cultivation of tree for the production of timber
dairy farming, dairying - the business of a dairy
gardening, horticulture - the cultivation of plants
tilling - cultivation of the land in order to raise crops
aquiculture, hydroponics, tank farming - a technique of growing plants (without soil) in water containing dissolved nutrients
mixed farming - growing crops and feed and livestock all on the same farm
planting - putting seeds or young plants in the ground to grow; "the planting of corn is hard work"
ranching - farming for the raising of livestock (particularly cattle)
strip cropping - cultivation of crops in strips following the contours of the land to minimize erosion
subsistence farming - farming that provides for the basic needs of the farmer without surpluses for marketing
harvest time, harvest - the season for gathering crops
truck farming - growing vegetables for the market
smut - affect with smut or mildew, as of a crop such as corn
fertilize, fertilise, feed - provide with fertilizers or add nutrients to; "We should fertilize soil if we want to grow healthy plants"
thresh, thrash - beat the seeds out of a grain
sow, seed - place (seeds) in or on the ground for future growth; "She sowed sunflower seeds"
broadcast - sow over a wide area, especially by hand; "broadcast seeds"
inseminate, sow in, sow - place seeds in or on (the ground); "sow the ground with sunflower seeds"
reseed - seed again or anew
farm, produce, raise, grow - cultivate by growing, often involving improvements by means of agricultural techniques; "The Bordeaux region produces great red wines"; "They produce good ham in Parma"; "We grow wheat here"; "We raise hogs here"
carry - bear (a crop); "this land does not carry olives"
till - work land as by ploughing, harrowing, and manuring, in order to make it ready for cultivation; "till the soil"
crop, cultivate, work - prepare for crops; "Work the soil"; "cultivate the land"
overcrop, overcultivate - to exhaust by excessive cultivation; "the farmers overcropped the land"
plow, plough, turn - to break and turn over earth especially with a plow; "Farmer Jones plowed his east field last week"; "turn the earth in the Spring"
ridge - plough alternate strips by throwing the furrow onto an unploughed strip
disk, harrow - draw a harrow over (land)
hoe - dig with a hoe; "He is hoeing the flower beds"
cultivate - foster the growth of
3.agriculture - the federal department that administers programs that provide services to farmers (including research and soil conservation and efforts to stabilize the farming economy)Agriculture - the federal department that administers programs that provide services to farmers (including research and soil conservation and efforts to stabilize the farming economy); created in 1862
executive department - a federal department in the executive branch of the government of the United States
4.agriculture - the class of people engaged in growing foodagriculture - the class of people engaged in growing food
social class, socio-economic class, stratum, class - people having the same social, economic, or educational status; "the working class"; "an emerging professional class"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

agriculture

noun farming, culture, cultivation, husbandry, tillage, agronomy, agronomics The country is strong in both industry and agriculture.
Related words
adjective geoponic
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
زِرَاعَةزِرَاعَه
zemědělství
landbrugjordbrug
maanviljelymaatalous
poljoprivreda
landbúnaîur, jarîyrkja
農業
농업
agricultura
žemdirbystėžemės ūkiožemės ūkis
lauksaimniecībazemkopība
kmetijstvo
jordbruk
การเกษตรกรรม
nông nghiệp

agriculture

[ˈægrɪkʌltʃəʳ] Nagricultura f
Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (Brit) → Ministerio m de Agricultura, Pesca y Alimentación (Sp)
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

agriculture

[ˈægrɪkʌltʃər]
nagriculture f
modif [minister, official] → de l'agriculture
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

agriculture

nLandwirtschaft f; Minister of Agriculture (Brit) → Landwirtschaftsminister(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

agriculture

[ˈægrɪkʌltʃəʳ] nagricoltura
commercial agriculture → agricoltura di mercato
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

agriculture

(ˈӕgrikaltʃə) noun
(the science of) the cultivation of land. He is studying agriculture.
ˌagriˈcultural adjective
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

agriculture

زِرَاعَة zemědělství landbrug Landwirtschaft γεωργία agricultura maatalous agriculture poljoprivreda agricoltura 農業 농업 landbouw landbruk rolnictwo agricultura сельское хозяйство jordbruk การเกษตรกรรม tarım nông nghiệp 农业
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
Beside the salmon fishery of the Columbia, which is capable of being rendered a considerable source of profit; the great valleys of the lower country, below the elevated volcanic plateau, are calculated to give sustenance to countless flocks and herds, and to sustain a great population of graziers and agriculturists.
Only the following considerations can have led the historians to such a conclusion: (1) that history is written by learned men, and so it is natural and agreeable for them to think that the activity of their class supplies the basis of the movement of all humanity, just as a similar belief is natural and agreeable to traders, agriculturists, and soldiers (if they do not express it, that is merely because traders and soldiers do not write history), and (2) that spiritual activity, enlightenment, civilization, culture, ideas, are all indistinct, indefinite conceptions under whose banner it is very easy to use words having a still less definite meaning, and which can therefore be readily introduced into any theory.
Distracted hens in coops occupied spots where formerly stood chairs supporting sedate agriculturists. The chimney-corner and once blazing hearth was now filled with inverted beehives, in which the hens laid their eggs; while out of doors the plots that each succeeding householder had carefully shaped with his spade were torn by the cocks in wildest fashion.
The Moors were essentially a tolerant, broad-minded, liberal race of agriculturists, artisans and merchants--the very type of people that has made possible such civilization as we find today in America and Europe--while the Spaniards--"
I have hopes of turning this race into the greatest agriculturists of Pellucidar.
Definition: A moral agriculturist; a man who cultivates the field of human sympathy.
The gentleman with the gray whiskers was obviously an inveterate adherent of serfdom and a devoted agriculturist, who had lived all his life in the country.
Yet, in spite of the only too slightly veiled enmity between them, he was rather proud of the handsome lad and determined to give him a thorough stockman's and agriculturist's training.
A French privateer captured the vessel on her passage home, the flaxseed was condemned and sold, my ancestors being transferred in a body to the ownership of a certain agriculturist in the neighborhood of Evreux, who dealt largely in such articles.
But young Walter Franklin was a modern agriculturist. He had a telephone in his cow house, and he could figure up exactly what effect next year's Canada wheat crop would have on potatoes planted in the dark of the moon.
an agriculturist yesterday, a shoemaker to-day, and a school master to-morrow!
He doesn't understand anything about it, but ever since he started a cucumber-frame last summer he has regarded himself in the light of an agriculturist, and talks in this absurd way with the idea of impressing the rest of the terrace with the notion that he is a retired farmer.