ague

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a·gue

 (ā′gyo͞o)
n.
1. A febrile condition in which there are alternating periods of chills, fever, and sweating. Used chiefly in reference to the fevers associated with malaria.
2. A chill or fit of shivering.

[Middle English, from Old French (fievre) ague, sharp (fever), from Medieval Latin (febris) acūta, from Latin, feminine of acūtus; see acute.]

a′gu·ish (ā′gyo͞o-ĭsh) adj.
a′gu·ish·ly adv.
a′gu·ish·ness n.

ague

(ˈeɪɡjuː)
n
1. (Medicine) a fever with successive stages of fever and chills esp when caused by malaria
2. a fit of shivering
[C14: from Old French (fievre) ague acute fever; see acute]
ˈaguish adj
ˈaguishly adv

a•gue

(ˈeɪ gyu)

n.
1. chills, fever, and sweating associated with malaria.
2. any fever marked by shivering.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Middle French, short for fievre ague acute fever < Latin febris acūta]
a′gu•ish, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ague - a fit of shivering or shakingague - a fit of shivering or shaking  
illness, sickness, unwellness, malady - impairment of normal physiological function affecting part or all of an organism
2.ague - successive stages of chills and fever that is a symptom of malariaague - successive stages of chills and fever that is a symptom of malaria
malaria - an infective disease caused by sporozoan parasites that are transmitted through the bite of an infected Anopheles mosquito; marked by paroxysms of chills and fever
symptom - (medicine) any sensation or change in bodily function that is experienced by a patient and is associated with a particular disease
quartan - a malarial fever that recurs every fourth day
3.ague - a mark (') placed above a vowel to indicate pronunciation
accent mark, accent - a diacritical mark used to indicate stress or placed above a vowel to indicate a special pronunciation
Translations

ague

(archaic) [ˈeɪgjuː] Nfiebre f intermitente

ague

nSchüttelfrost m no art
References in classic literature ?
An ague very violent; the fit held me seven hours; cold fit and hot, with faint sweats after it.
The ague again so violent that I lay a-bed all day, and neither ate nor drank.
Having been somewhat refreshed with the sleep I had had, and the fit being entirely off, I got up; and though the fright and terror of my dream was very great, yet I considered that the fit of the ague would return again the next day, and now was my time to get something to refresh and support myself when I should be ill; and the first thing I did, I filled a large square case-bottle with water, and set it upon my table, in reach of my bed; and to take off the chill or aguish disposition of the water, I put about a quarter of a pint of rum into it, and mixed them together.
The application which I made use of was perfectly new, and perhaps which had never cured an ague before; neither can I recommend it to any to practise, by this experiment: and though it did carry off the fit, yet it rather contributed to weakening me; for I had frequent convulsions in my nerves and limbs for some time.
Pierre noticed that he was pale and that his jaw quivered and shook as if in an ague.
Trent himself had done his share of the carrying, ever keeping his eyes fixed upon the death-lit face of their burden, every ready to fight off the progress of the fever and ague, as the twitching lips or shivering limbs gave warning of a change.
Heathcliff, having stared his son into an ague of confusion, uttered a scornful laugh.
Maybe you don't count it nothing to have a real college doctor to see you every day--you, John, with your head broke--or you, George Merry, that had the ague shakes upon you not six hours agone, and has your eyes the colour of lemon peel to this same moment on the clock?
He opened at once his little eyes and his great mouth, to inhale better the joke his eminence deigned to address to him, and ended by a burst of laughter, so violent that his great limbs shook in hilarity as they would have done in an ague.
The bee hunter is generally some settler on the verge of the prairies; a long, lank fellow, of fever and ague complexion, acquired from living on new soil, and in a hut built of green logs.
Mr Jones now fell a trembling as if he had been shaken with the fit of an ague.
The hottest suns of India never heated his temper; and the Walcheren ague never shook it.