air bladder

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air bladder

n.
2. See float.

air bladder

n
1. (Zoology) ichthyol Also called: swim bladder an air-filled sac, lying above the alimentary canal in bony fishes, that regulates buoyancy at different depths by a variation in the pressure of the air
2. (Botany) any air-filled sac, such as one of the bladders of seaweeds

air′ blad`der


n.
1. a vesicle or sac containing air.
2. an air-filled sac at the top of the body cavity in bony fishes, serving in most to regulate hydrostatic pressure. Also called swim bladder.
[1725–35]

air bladder

An air-filled sac in many fish that helps maintain buoyancy or, in some species, helps in respiration, sound production, or hearing. Also called swim bladder. See float.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.air bladder - an air-filled sac near the spinal column in many fishes that helps maintain buoyancyair bladder - an air-filled sac near the spinal column in many fishes that helps maintain buoyancy
sac - a structure resembling a bag in an animal
References in periodicals archive ?
Tenders are invited for Supply of M/s Obermeyer Hydro Inc , USA, make air bladders for pneumatic gales installed at Pise weir
The GRF sensor only measured force along the vertical axis from the ground by measuring pressure changes within the air bladders. The tangential GRF was assumed to be negligible, because the magnitude of the vertical force is about 20 times more than both the lateral shear force and progressional shear force during walking [54, 55].
Forty-five percent showed signs of overinflated air bladders. Biologists kept a sample group, half with symptoms and half without, and watched them for several days to see how they fared.
Gar use their air bladders as rudimentary lungs, and they can survive in warm, low-oxygen water that other kinds of fish can't.
Using remote-inflated air bladders, the arm of the new Micro Premium lateral cutter positions itself remotely by creeping and climbing, clamps itself for precise cutting in vertical or horizontal orientation and feeds the cutting head a full four inches.
12), the author comments that primitive lungs "probably evolved from the air bladders found in fish." Since it might very well be just the opposite, instead of this phrasing I think it better to simply acknowledge the evolutionary homology [relatedness] of air bladders and lungs.
Using remote-inflated air bladders, the arm of the new Micro Pro lateral cutter positions itself remotely by creeping and climbing; clamps itself for precise cutting in vertical or horizontal orientation; and feeds the cutting head a full 4 inches.