air shed

Related to air shed: Nonpoint source

air shed

n.
1. The air supply of a given region.
2. The geographic region that shares an air supply.

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
For other industries, the emissions standards do not vary based on the quality of the air shed of the city in which these industries are based.
So, in October and November, just as winter inversion is settling in, this fire makes its way to the already polluted air shed of Delhi.
The Los Angeles/Riverside/Orange County region in California is the country's worst air shed. This region is a densely populated area with a special geography and car-based transportation strategy that exacerbates the problem.
If a plant sticks to burning sawdust and bark, that's one thing, Baldwin said, but if a plant is allowed to bring in paper or even old tires from the waste stream, the plant can sully the air shed.
The model will also be able to factor in other key concerns about a plant's environment, including access to transmission lines, distance to fuel sources, and receiving air shed conditions.
Short of building ourselves a literal glass bubble, air contamination and the existence of a global air shed which freely mixes toxins across national boundaries, demonstrates the absolute limits of the inverted quarantine approach.
air shed," said RailPower president and CEO Jim Maier.
The study found that there would be seven days with greater than a 5 percent change in visibility and one day with greater than a 10 percent loss in visibility, which, said Jewett, "means that the Roundup plant alone will impair the park air shed under the Clean Air Act."
The emission information is then used in urban air shed models to predict urban air quality.
binational air shed task force, an outstanding model for involving local
Wood may not be the best fuel choice in densely populated urban areas where automobile exhaust and other pollution already puts excessive strains on the air shed. But in suburban, small town, and rural areas, wood makes good sense.