air-minded

(redirected from air-mindedness)

air-minded

adj
interested in or promoting aviation or aircraft
ˈair-ˌmindedness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Two groups use the term air-mindedness. For scholars studying aviation, the term refers to early twentieth-century attitudes toward flight.
current lack of air-mindedness is not only wrong, but dangerous: the
One cannot understand American air-mindedness without analyzing that aspect of airpower, the most glaring deficiency of the book.
On a broader level, the study explores the militarization of civil aviation, international responses to America's quest for dominance, the evolution of a culture of aviation, and the conceptual impact of "air-mindedness" on strategic, economic, and ideological discourses in the United States.
Another area, that Trest treats in greater detail but still begs for additional discussion, is Cleveland's role in reshaping and redirecting the Air University; establishing the Center for Aerospace Doctrine, Research, and Education (CADRE); the Gathering of Eagles heritage program; and using the Project Warrior initiative (a major aerospace education and awareness program of the 1980s Air Force that deserves its own detailed examination) to promote air-mindedness and a warrior ethos among students at Air University.
Its mission is to promote the Royal Air Force, to support its people now and into the future and to encourage air-mindedness and the aviation-related education of youth.
Its mission is to promote the RAF, to support its people now and into the future and to encourage air-mindedness and the aviation-related education of youth.
They stressed the fact that the airline was cultivating air-mindedness and fostering 'the flying spirit' among Britain's seafaring subjects.
If the Air Force is going to become the premiere force to fly, fight, and win in cyberspace, it must reclaim its proud cyber heritage and build "cyber-mindedness," just as it has a tradition of air-mindedness. If it can succeed in this, the Air Force can again be seen as the cyber thought leaders in the military service and show the way for the other services, the Department of Defense, and the intelligence community.
In comparing Soviet air-mindedness with that of Russia before the revolution, Palmer comes out strongly for continuity (82).
Lewis is no purveyor of airpower theories, but his narrative illuminates the beginnings of what we now call "air-mindedness." His memoir shows that, from the beginning, air forces could not help but view war radically differently from how it was understood by land forces, even though all of his missions were in support of ground operations.