air-raid warden

air-raid warden

n
(Military) a member of a civil defence organization responsible for enforcing regulations, etc, during an air attack
References in periodicals archive ?
He had to be invalided out of the Army as he contracted pneumonia, but he was still able to continue his service by becoming an air-raid warden in East London.
Dad's work in communications ensured he remained a civilian but he became an air-raid warden and added many fire-watching nights to his daily routine.
My dad, who worked at Ranger (a smaller defense company), was also an air-raid warden in our neighborhood and learned to identify many types of aircraft by sight.
Laurie Latchford, an air-raid warden in Newton, Mumbles, recalled in his diaries: "There were leaping flames over the whole stretch of Swansea, from behind Clyne Hill to the dock's entrance.
He said: "Living half a mile from Wellington Mills and my father being an air-raid warden, I well remember the night in 1940 when a bomb (or was it a mine?) dropped and a girl from a house by the mill was brought to stay the rest of the night in our house in Howard Road.
During WWII, she worked as an air-raid warden in the U.S.
My father stayed in Coventry to continue his job at Alfred Herberts and to help in his capacity as an air-raid warden. It was all very unsettling.
Audrey's father was an air-raid warden during a raid.
My uncle Ernest Tudor, who was an air-raid warden, had to dig us out after one particularly heavy raid.
Young children are instinctive reactionaries, and Carl was no exception; he drove his parents crazy by serving as class air-raid warden and brandishing a"I Like Ike" button while his parents wondered whether to compromise and support Adlai Stevenson or back Vincent Hallinan of the Progressive party.
The plane-spotter and air-raid warden programs were created by the US Department of Civilian Defense, which was activated in May 1941 when US involvement in the global war seemed increasingly likely.